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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Dynamics of Cage Floating Breakwater

[+] Author and Article Information
K. Murali

Dept. of Ocean Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai-600036, Indiamurali@iitm.ac.in

S. S. Amer

Dept. of Ocean Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai-600036, Indiasyeḏshafiuddin@yahoo.com

J. S. Mani

Dept. of Ocean Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai-600036, Indiamanijs@hotmail.com

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 127(4), 331-339 (May 27, 2005) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2073347 History: Received July 19, 2004; Revised May 27, 2005

Floating breakwaters have potential applications in protecting minor ports and harbors such as fisheries and recreational harbors, where-in stringent tranquillity requirements are not warranted. In field applications of the existing floating breakwaters, limitations are imposed due to their large relative width (ratio between breakwater width and wave length) requirements to achieve desirable tranquillity level. This relative width requirement is greater than 0.3 for the existing floating breakwaters. To overcome the above drawback associated with the existing system a new configuration for a floating breakwater is derived, which could yield the desired performance with minimum relative width requirement. The floating breakwater comprises of two pontoons rigidly connected together and each of the pontoons having a row of cylinders attached beneath, for improved performance characteristics. The laboratory tests were conducted in both regular and random wave flumes to study the dynamic behavior of the breakwater. Transmission and reflection coefficients, water surface elevations and velocities inside the cage like area provided in between the pontoons, rigid body motions floating breakwater and mooring forces were studied under regular and random waves and under the regular waves followed by a uniform current. The results proved the suitability of the floating breakwater to the field conditions even for large wave periods. In addition the variations in water particle kinematics, rigid body motion and mooring forces show nominal magnitudes when compared to the existing systems indicating the rigidness of the breakwater.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 3

Variation of transmission, reflection, and energy loss coefficient for different value of stiffness of the mooring line. Test conditions are G∕D=0.22, d∕h=0.46, b∕B=1.0, pretension=22.5%.

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Figure 4

Variation of sway, heave, and roll RAO for different values of stiffness of the mooring lines. Test conditions: G∕D=0.22. b∕B=1.0, pretension=22.5%.

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Figure 5

Effect of stiffness of the mooring lines on forces in the mooring line

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Figure 6

Effect of waves and currents on Kt

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Figure 7

Influence of following currents on sway, heave, and roll RAO of cage floating breakwater

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Figure 8

Effect of following currents on forces in the mooring line

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Figure 1

Details of cage floating breakwater geometry

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Figure 2

Comparison of the CFB’s performance with existing floating breakwater

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