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Research Papers

Status Review on Fatigue Performance of Fillet Welds

[+] Author and Article Information
Stephen J. Maddox

 TWI Ltd., Granta Park, Great Abington, Cambridge CB1 6AL, UKstephen.maddox@twi.co.uk

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 130(3), 031006 (Jul 16, 2008) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2827941 History: Received June 22, 2006; Revised June 14, 2007; Published July 16, 2008

This paper presents a critical review of current design methods, including their background and relevant experimental data, for assessing the fatigue performance of steel fillet welds with respect to failure in the weld throat. The main focus is on fillet or partial penetration welds in cruciform, T, or lap joints under transverse loading failing by fatigue crack growth across the weld throat under normal stresses. The review covers the influence of residual stress, applied mean stress, joint fit-up and alignment, weld quality, the use of coated steel, the need for a plate thickness correction, and calculation of the optimum weld size. Also considered are cases of fillet welds failing in shear or combined normal and shear stresses.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Current design S-N curves for considering potential fatigue failure in fillet weld throats

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Figure 2

Weld throat stresses used in fatigue assessments

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Figure 3

Published fatigue data for cruciform fillet-welded joints failing in the weld throat

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Figure 4

Fatigue data for fillet-welded cruciform joints failing in the weld throat tested under high stress ratio or high stress range

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Figure 5

Optimum fillet weld sizes calculated assuming 25mm reference thickness and DNV design curves for thickness exponents for plate failure of k=0.25 and 0.3

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Figure 6

Fatigue test results for axially misaligned cruciform joints (40) expressed in terms of (a) nominal stress range on weld throat and (b) stress magnification factor km× nominal stress range on weld throat

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Figure 7

(a) Effect of welding onto coated steel on the fatigue performance of fillet-welded cruciform joints and (b) example of zinc penetration cracking in fillet welds made onto galvanized steel plate

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Figure 8

Fatigue test results obtained from transverse fillet-welded lap joints failing in the weld throat

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Figure 9

Fatigue test results obtained from fillet-welded pipe to plate joints failing by shear in the weld throat uder torsion loading

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Figure 10

Fatigue test results obtained from longitudinal fillet-welded joints failing by shear in the weld throat

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Figure 13

Fatigue test results obtained by Dahle (52) from fillet-welded box beams that failed by transverse fatigue cracking across the weld, expressed in terms of the maximum principal stress range

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Figure 12

Fatigue test results obtained by Dahle (52) from fillet-welded box beams that failed by longitudinal shear fatigue cracking in the weld throat, expressed in terms of the average shear stress range on the weld throat

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Figure 11

Fatigue test results obtained from longitudinal welds in beams failing by shear in the weld throat

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