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Safety and Reliability

Sensitivity Approach for Modeling Stochastic Field of Keulegan–Carpenter and Reynolds Numbers Through a Matrix Response Surface

[+] Author and Article Information
Franck Schoefs1

Institute in Civil and Mechanical Engineering (GeM), Nantes Atlantic University, CNRS UMR 6183, 2 rue de la Houssinière, 44072 Nantes Cedex 03, Francefranck.schoefs@univ-nantes.fr

Morgan L. Boukinda

Institute in Civil and Mechanical Engineering (GeM), Nantes Atlantic University, CNRS UMR 6183, 2 rue de la Houssinière, 44072 Nantes Cedex 03, France

1

Corresponding author.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 132(1), 011602 (Dec 22, 2009) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3160386 History: Received September 28, 2007; Revised December 09, 2008; Published December 22, 2009; Online December 22, 2009

The actual challenge for requalification of existing offshore structures through a rational process of reassessment indicates the importance of employing a response surface methodology. At different steps in the quantitative analysis, quite a lot of approximations are performed as a surrogate for the original model in subsequent uncertainty and sensitivity studies. This paper proposes to employ a geometrical description of the nth order Stokes model in the form of a random linear combination of deterministic vectors. These vectors are obtained by rotation transformations of the wave directional vector. This facilitates introduction of an appropriate level of complexity in stochastic modeling of the wave velocity and of the Reynolds and Keulegan–Carpenter numbers for probabilistic mechanics analysis of offshore structures. In situ measurements are used to assess suitable ranges and distributions of basic variables.

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Figures

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Figure 1

Fluctuations of N-(D) for four statistics of k

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Figure 2

Fluctuations of D(x,0.8,0) for given statistics of k

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Figure 3

Fluctuations of tanh(kdz)(z=0.8)

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Figure 4

Probability density of α1(x,0.8) for three values of x

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Figure 5

Probability density of α1(x,z) for three values of x

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Figure 6

First statistics of Re as function of z for a vertical beam

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Figure 7

First statistics of KC as function of z for a vertical beam

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Figure 8

Distribution of Re for a vertical beam (Z=−50 m)

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Figure 9

Distribution of Re for a vertical beam (Z=−100 m)

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