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Ocean Engineering

A Nonlinear Three-Dimensional Coupled Fluid-Sediment Interaction Model for Large Seabed Deformation

[+] Author and Article Information
Tomoaki Nakamura

Institute for Advanced Research, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601, Japantnakamura@nagoya-u.jp

Solomon C. Yim

School of Civil and Construction Engineering, Oregon State University, 220 Owen Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331-3212solomon.yim@oregonstate.edu

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 133(3), 031103 (Mar 30, 2011) (14 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002733 History: Received January 31, 2010; Revised June 01, 2010; Published March 30, 2011; Online March 30, 2011

A nonlinear three-dimensional two-way coupled fluid-sediment interaction model is developed in this study. The model is composed of a generalized Navier–Stokes solver (GNS) with a volume of fluid module for air-water interface tracking and a sediment transport module (STM) for fluid-sediment interface tracking. The GNS model is based on the finite difference method with a turbulent stress model of large-eddy simulation to compute incompressible viscous multiphase flows. The STM is used to compute nonlinear sediment bed profile change due to bed-load sediment transport. A two-way coupling scheme connecting GNS with STM is implemented at each time step to ensure the fluid-sediment interaction. For validation, the fluid-sediment interaction model is applied to predict cross-shore profile change of a sloping beach due to breaking solitary waves, and the resulting predictions are examined and compared with the measured data from a set of hydraulic tests. It is found that the fluid-sediment interaction model predicts reasonably well the sediment transport and the resulting beach profile change. The sensitivity of model parameters involving the sediment transport to the beach profile change is analyzed. Finally, the fluid-sediment interaction model is applied to predict local scour in front of a quay wall due to a jet flow to demonstrate its applicability to general three-dimensional problems.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic illustration of the computational domain of FSM (the main solver, GNS, and the two modules, VOF and STM)

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Figure 2

Force balance on a moving sediment particle on a sloping bed

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Figure 3

Two-way coupling procedure between GNS and STM

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Figure 4

Wave flume for beach profile change due to solitary waves: (a) experimental setup and the position of wave gauges (9) and (b) computational domain and the definition of the saturation height hs

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Figure 5

Predicted and measured beach profile change after the fourth wave for the best-fit case

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Figure 6

Predicted and measured water surface elevations during the fourth wave for the best-fit case

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Figure 7

Evolution of the predicted beach profile for the best-fit case

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Figure 8

Predicted wave field and the resulting beach profile change during the first wave for the best-fit case: (a) 5.8 s after the wave begins to be generated, (b) 6.3 s, (c) 8.9 s, (d) 12.6 s, (e) 16.1 s, (f) 19.2 s, and (g) 30.0 s

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Figure 9

Effects of the coefficient of the friction velocity Cvf and the dynamic friction angle θd on the beach profile after the fourth wave for the saturation height hs of 0.15 m: (a) RMSE of the beach profile change, (b) total erosion volume per unit width Ve, (c) maximum erosion depth demax, (d) its location xdemax, (e) maximum deposition depth ddmax, and (f) its location xddmax

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Figure 10

Effects of the saturation height hs on the beach profile after the fourth wave: (a) RMSE of the beach profile change, (b) total erosion volume per unit width Ve, (c) maximum erosion depth demax, (d) its location xdemax, (e) maximum deposition depth ddmax, and (f) its location xddmax

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Figure 11

Computational domain for local scour due to the jet flow

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Figure 12

Predicted and measured excess pore-water pressures (solid lines: numerical results with topographic change (TC) computed using FSM; dotted lines: numerical results without TC computed using GNS and VOF; circles: experimental data measured in Mizutani (27))

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Figure 13

Computed local scour due to the jet flow: (a) evolution of the scour hole (top: 1.0 s after the flow begins to be generated, center: 10.0 s, and bottom: 60.0 s) and (b) final scour depth zsf at 60.0 s

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