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Materials Technology

Effects of Welding Residual Stresses on High Tensile Steel Plate Ultimate Strength: Nonlinear Finite Element Method Investigations

[+] Author and Article Information
Jeom Kee Paik

 The Lloyd’s Register Educational Trust Research Centre of Excellence Pusan National University 30 Jangjeon-Dong, Geumjeong-Gu Busan 609-735, Koreajeompaik@pusan.ac.kr

Jung Min Sohn

 Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, Pusan National University 30 Jangjeon-Dong, Geumjeong-Gu Busan 609-735, Koreajminz@pusan.ac.kr

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 134(2), 021401 (Dec 02, 2011) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004510 History: Received July 18, 2009; Revised April 20, 2010; Published December 02, 2011; Online December 02, 2011

The primary objective of the present paper is to examine the effects of welding residual stresses on ultimate strength of high tensile steel plates under axial compression in terms of their magnitude and pattern. The ANSYS nonlinear finite element method is employed for the purpose. The secondary objective of the present paper is to study a nonlinear finite element method modeling technique for welded plate structures with residual stresses. Three levels of residual stresses, namely slight, average, and severe, are considered. As another important parameter of influence on the plate ultimate strength, the plate thickness is also varied in the numerical computations to examine their role and trend. Important insights and conclusions developed from the present study are documented.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Typical pattern of residual stress distribution in welded stiffened plate panels

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Figure 2

Various idealizations of residual stress distribution in a plate element [2]

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Figure 3

Nomenclature: Distribution of welding residual stress inside a plate element in both longitudinal and transverse directions [2]

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Figure 4

A simply supported rectangular plate under uniaxial compressive actions

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Figure 5

A sample of the nonlinear finite element method model together with boundary condition applied

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Figure 6

(a) The plate ultimate strength behavior with varying the number of finite elements in the heat-affected zone—slight level of residual stresses, σrcy=0; (b) the plate ultimate strength behavior with varying the number of finite elements in the heat-affected zone—average level of residual stresses, σrcy=0; (c) the plate ultimate strength behavior with varying the number of finite elements in the heat-affected zone—severe level of residual stresses, σrcy=0

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Figure 7

The effect of transverse residual stresses on the plate ultimate strength behavior under longitudinal compression

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Figure 8

(a) The ultimate compressive strength behavior of thin plates with varying the level of residual stresses, σrtx=σY; (b) the ultimate compressive strength behavior of thin plates with varying the level of residual stresses, σrtx=0.8σY

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Figure 9

(a) The ultimate compressive strength behavior of medium-thick plates with varying the level of residual stresses, σrtx=σY; (b) the ultimate compressive strength behavior of medium-thick plates with varying the level of residual stresses, σrtx=0.8σY

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Figure 10

(a) The ultimate compressive strength behavior of thick plates with varying the level of residual stresses, σrtx=σY; (b) the ultimate compressive strength behavior of thick plates with varying the level of residual stresses, σrtx=0.8σY

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Figure 11

Reduction of the plate ultimate compressive strength with increase in residual stresses for different plate thicknesses

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