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Piper and Riser Technology

Pattern Studies of Strain Distributions for Detecting Pipe Wrinkling

[+] Author and Article Information
Z. L. Chou

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering,  University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2W2, Canadazchou@ualberta.ca

J. J. R. Cheng

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering,  University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2W2, Canadaroger.cheng@ualberta.ca

J. Zhou

 TransCanada Pipelines Ltd., 450 - 1 Street SW, Calgary, AB, T2P 5H1, Canadajoe_zhou@transcanada.com

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 134(2), 021702 (Dec 05, 2011) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004522 History: Received May 30, 2010; Revised March 24, 2011; Published December 05, 2011; Online December 05, 2011

As both onshore and offshore pipeline constructions push further into higher risk terrains, such as geologically unstable terrain and the Arctic region, the risk of local buckling failure (wrinkling) for these buried pipelines has been increasing gradually. However, current methods used to prevent buried pipelines from buckling failure are expensive, time consuming, and unreliable. Therefore, to overcome these problems, a reliable method of predicting pipeline wrinkling is proposed. The method can provide active warning for pipeline wrinkling through a decision-making system (DMS). The DMS has been designed to identify strain distribution patterns and their development on critical pipe segments and detect the onset of pipe wrinkling. To create a reliable DMS, studies of the strain distribution patterns of line-pipes during pipe buckling are very important. In this paper, the strain distribution patterns of various line-pipes are presented. These line-pipes have different material and geometric properties, loading conditions, and manufacturing conditions. A total of 32 sets of experimental results and 72 sets of finite element analyses (FEA) along with parametric studies were included in the study. The study revealed significant behavioral characteristics of the strain distribution patterns during pipe buckling and important parameters affecting these strain patterns. For practical application, three thresholds of the strain distribution patterns are proposed. Furthermore, the optimal positions and spacing of the strain measurements for early detecting pipelines wrinkling are discussed as well.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Pipes , Buckling , Pipelines
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References

Figures

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Figure 2

Compressive strain distributions for plain pipe

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Figure 3

Compressive strain distributions for girth weld pipe

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Figure 4

Compressive strain distributions for pipe under cyclic axial compression

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Figure 5

Typical cold bend pipe experiment

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Figure 6

Compressive strain distributions for cold bend pipe

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Figure 7

Compressive strain distribution for high strength pipe

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Figure 9

Strains history at 45° position

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Figure 10

Strains history at 67.5° position

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Figure 11

Strains history at 180° position

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Figure 12

Strains for pipe X65dt60U00

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Figure 13

Strains for pipe X65dt60U40

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Figure 14

Strains for pipe X65dt60U80

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Figure 15

Strains for pipe X100DT40C80

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Figure 16

Strain distributions for X80dt80U80

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Figure 17

Wrinkle location for girth weld pipe X80dt80U80

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Figure 20

Strain ratios versus moment ratios (SRMR) curve

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Figure 21

Threshold patterns for pipe wrinkling

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Figure 22

Pipe section before and after pipe deformation

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Figure 23

Strain distributions at the limit points in different measuring spaces

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Figure 19

Wrinkle location for X80dt40U80

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Figure 18

Strain distributions for X80dt40U80

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Figure 8

Strains history at 0° position

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Figure 1

The wrinkle of a pipeline

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