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Offshore and Structural Mechanics

Three-Dimensional Numerical Simulations of Flows Past Smooth and Rough/Bare and Helically Straked Circular Cylinders Allowed to Undergo Two Degree-of-Freedom Motions

[+] Author and Article Information
Juan P. Pontaza, Raghu G. Menon

Shell Global Solutions (US) Inc., Fluid Flow & Flow Assurance, Westhollow Technology Center, Houston, TX 77082

Hamn-Ching Chen

Department of Civil Engineering, Ocean Engineering Program, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 131(2), 021301 (Mar 30, 2009) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3058697 History: Received September 20, 2007; Revised February 26, 2008; Published March 30, 2009

We simulate the flow past smooth and rough rigid circular cylinders that are either bare or outfitted with helical strakes. We consider operating conditions that correspond to high Reynolds numbers of 105 and 106, and allow for two degree-of-freedom motions such that the structure is allowed to respond to flow-induced cross-flow and in-line forces. The computations are performed using a parallelized Navier–Stokes in-house solver using overset grids. For smooth surface simulations at a Reynolds number of 105, we use a Smagorinsky large eddy simulation turbulence model and for the Reynolds number cases of 106 we make use of the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations with a two-layer k-epsilon turbulence model. The rough surface modifications of the two-layer k-epsilon turbulence model due to Durbin (2001, “Rough Wall Modification of Two-Layer k-Epsilon  ,” ASME J. Fluids Eng., 123, pp. 16–21) are implemented to account for surface roughness effects. In all our computations we aim to resolve the boundary layer directly by using adequate grid spacing in the near-wall region. The predicted global flow parameters under different surface conditions are in good agreement with experimental data, and significant vortex-induced vibration suppression is observed when using helically straked cylinders.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

A Z-slice of the computational domain showing the multiple-block structure of the overset grid in the XY plane

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Figure 2

Close-up view of the body-fitted block-structured grid around the straked cylinder

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Figure 3

Spanwise cut along Y=0.0, showing the grid distribution in the spanwise direction. Blocks in the vicinity of the cylinder have higher spanwise resolution.

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Figure 4

Time histories of drag and lift coefficients for flow past fixed smooth and rough (bare) cylinders at Re=106

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Figure 5

Instantaneous vorticity isosurfaces for flow past a fixed (bare) cylinder at Re=105 (top) and Re=106 (bottom)

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Figure 6

Instantaneous vorticity contours for flow past a straked cylinder at Re=105

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Figure 7

Instantaneous pressure contours for flow past a straked cylinder at Re=105

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Figure 8

XY response of elastically mounted (smooth) bare and helically straked cylinders at Re=105

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Figure 9

Cross-flow displacement signal for elastically mounted (bare) cylinders undergoing VIV at Re=106

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Figure 10

Time histories of drag and lift coefficients for elastically mounted (bare) cylinders undergoing VIV at Re=106

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Figure 11

XY response of rough, elastically mounted bare, and helically straked cylinders at Re=106

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