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Offshore Technology

Conceptual Design of Monocolumn Production and Storage With Dry Tree Capability

[+] Author and Article Information
Rodolfo T. Gonçalves

TPN-Numerical Offshore Tank, Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, University of São Paulo, Avenue Prof. Mello Moraes, 2231, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, SP, 05508-900, Brazilrodolfo_tg@tpn.usp.br

Fabio T. Matsumoto

TPN-Numerical Offshore Tank, Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, University of São Paulo, Avenue Prof. Mello Moraes, 2231, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, SP, 05508-900, Brazilfabio_matsumoto@tpn.usp.br

Edgard B. Malta

TPN-Numerical Offshore Tank, Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, University of São Paulo, Avenue Prof. Mello Moraes, 2231, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, SP, 05508-900, Braziledgard@tpn.usp.br

Higor F. Medeiros

TPN-Numerical Offshore Tank, Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, University of São Paulo, Avenue Prof. Mello Moraes, 2231, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, SP, 05508-900, Brazilhigorfm@gmail.com

Kazuo Nishimoto

TPN-Numerical Offshore Tank, Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, University of São Paulo, Avenue Prof. Mello Moraes, 2231, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, SP, 05508-900, Brazilknishimo@usp.br

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 132(4), 041301 (Sep 23, 2010) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001429 History: Received February 06, 2009; Revised October 23, 2009; Published September 23, 2010; Online September 23, 2010

A new concept and a preliminary study for a monocolumn floating unit are introduced, aimed at exploring and producing oil in ultradeep waters. This platform, which combines two relevant features—great oil storage capacity and dry tree production capability—comprises two bodies with relatively independent heave motions between them. A parametric model is used to define the main design characteristics of the floating units. A set of design alternatives is generated using this procedure. These solutions are evaluated in terms of stability requirements and dynamic response. A mathematical model is developed to estimate the first order heave and pitch motions of the platform. Experimental tests are carried out in order to calibrate this model. The response of each body alone is estimated numerically using the WAMIT ® code. This paper also includes a preliminary study on the platform mooring system and appendages. The study of the heave plates presents the gain, in terms of decreasing the motions, achieved by the introduction of the appropriate appendages to the platform.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of the new concept

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Figure 3

Prototype dimensions—main body

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Figure 4

Prototype dimensions—inner body

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Figure 5

Experimental setup—SS2

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Figure 6

Mesh of the main body

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Figure 7

Comparison of the heave motion RAO—main body

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Figure 8

Comparison of the heave motion RAO—inner body

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Figure 9

Comparison of the heave motion RAO—inner body with main body

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Figure 10

Comparison of the pitch motion RAO—main body

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Figure 11

Discretization of the floating unit in slices

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Figure 12

Design variables

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Figure 13

Loading conditions

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Figure 14

Example of the relative motion between the bodies

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Figure 15

Main dimensions—C03 alternative

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Figure 16

Heave motion RAOs—main body

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Figure 17

Pitch motion RAOs—main body

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Figure 18

Heave motion RAOs—inner body with risers, restoring forces

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Figure 19

Heave motion RAOs–including viscous damping–main body

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Figure 20

Pitch motion RAOs including viscous damping—main body

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Figure 21

Heave motion RAOs including viscous damping—inner body

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Figure 22

Significant double amplitude acceleration at deck of the inner body—alternative C03-LC2 loading condition

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Figure 23

Low frequency surge motion rms

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Figure 24

Static forces on alternative C03

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Figure 25

Different damping coefficients on low frequency surge motion

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Figure 26

Mooring line layout: (a) 12 lines, (b) 14 lines, (c) 16 lines, (d) 18 lines, (e) 20 lines, and (f) 24 lines

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Figure 27

Feasible solutions of the mooring systems ζ=2%

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Figure 28

Main dimension of the hydrodynamic appendage

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Figure 29

Platform and hydrodynamic appendage models

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Figure 30

Heave motion RAOs—hydrodynamic appendage experimental results

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Figure 31

Pitch motion RAOs—hydrodynamic appendage experimental results

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Figure 32

Free surface elevation at moonpool RAOs—hydrodynamic appendage experimental results

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