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Ocean Engineering

Experimental Study on Dynamic Response and Shock Damage of Cylindrical Shell Structures Subjected to Underwater Explosion

[+] Author and Article Information
Liang-Jun Li1

State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, Chinaljli@sjtu.edu.cn

Wei-Kang Jiang

State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China

Yan-Hui Ai

 No. 710 Institute of China Ship Heavy Industry Group Corporation, Yichang 443004, China

1

Corresponding author.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 133(1), 011102 (Nov 04, 2010) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001441 History: Received November 11, 2009; Revised February 01, 2010; Published November 04, 2010; Online November 04, 2010

This study investigates the dynamic linear, nonlinear responses, and shock damage of two kinds of submerged cylindrical shell models exposed to underwater spherical trinitrotoluene (TNT) charge explosions in a circular lake. Two endplates and a middle plate are mounted on the cylindrical shells to provide support and create two enclosed spaces. The two kinds of cylindrical shell models are unfilled and main hull sand-filled, respectively. Fifteen different tests are carried out according to changing the TNT explosive weights of 1 kg and 2 kg, standoff distances ranging from 3 m to 0.3 m, and two explosion positions, and the measured experimental results are compared with each other. Detailed discussions on the experimental results show that the dynamic responses and damage modes are much different, and the main hull sand-filled cylindrical shell is more difficult to be damaged by the shock wave loading than the unfilled model. The edge cracks are mainly observed at the instrument hull of the main hull sand-filled model, but surface tearing and cracks take place both on the main and instrumental hulls of the unfilled model, respectively.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 2

Schematic of shock positions: (a) shock position 1 and (b) shock position 2

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Figure 13

The history of the dynamic strain at A1 and A2 in test 2: (a) axial strain at A1, (b) 45 deg directional strain at A1, (c) circumferential strain at A1, (d) axial strain at A2, (e) 45 deg directional strain at A2, and (f) circumferential strain at A2

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Figure 14

The time history of the dynamic strain at A1 and A2 in test 13: (a) 45 deg directional strain at A1, (b) circumferential strain at A1, (c) axial strain at A2, (d) 45 deg directional strain at A2, and (e) circumferential strain at A2

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Figure 1

Cylindrical shell consisting of twin hulls experimental model

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Figure 4

Experimental setup hung at a floating platform

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Figure 5

Experimental facility at the China Ship Scientific Research Center (NFSC)

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Figure 7

Deformation of the test model in test 10

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Figure 8

Deformation of the test model in test 11

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Figure 9

Deformation of the test model in test 12

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Figure 10

Deformation of the test model in test 15

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Figure 3

Layout of the hydrophone in shock position 1

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Figure 6

Deformation of the test model in test 9

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Figure 11

The time history of the shock wave load at B1 and B2 in test 1

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Figure 12

The time history of the shock wave load at b1 and b2 in test 4

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