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Technical Briefs

A Novel Method for Generating Continuously Surfable Waves—Comparison of Predictions With Experimental Results

[+] Author and Article Information
Steven A. Schmied

Australian Maritime College,
Launceston Tasmania Australia,
6 Edinburgh Street,
Hampton Victoria,
3188Australia
e-mail: sschmie@tpg.com.au

Jonathan R. Binns

e-mail: j.binns@amc.edu.au

Martin R. Renilson

Professor
e-mail: martin.renilson@hct.ac.ae

Giles A. Thomas

Associate Professor
e-mail: giles@amc.edu.au

Gregor J. Macfarlane

e-mail: g.macfarlane@amc.edu.au
Australian Maritime College,
Locked Bag 1395,
University of Tasmania,
Launceston Tasmania,
7250Australia

Rene Huijsmans

Professor
Delft University of Technology,
Room Number 7-1-127,
Mekelweg 2,
Delft, 2628CD,
The Netherlands
e-mail: R.H.M.Huijsmans@TUDelft.NL

1Currently employed as Dean, Maritime at the Higher Colleges of Technology, United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING. Manuscript received September 23, 2011; final manuscript received August 13, 2012; published online May 22, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Daniel T. Valentine.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 135(3), 034501 (May 22, 2013) (9 pages) Paper No: OMAE-11-1083; doi: 10.1115/1.4023798 History: Received September 23, 2011; Revised August 13, 2012

In this paper, a novel idea to produce continuous breaking waves is discussed, whereby a pressure source is rotated within an annular wave pool, with the inner ring of the annulus having a sloping bathymetry to induce wave breaking. In order to refine the technique, work is being conducted to better understand the mechanics of surfable waves generated by moving pressure sources in restricted water. The pool aims to be capable of creating waves suitable for surfers from beginner to expert level, with an added benefit being by providing a safe learning environment, the overall surfing ability of the participants should be improved. The method of approach reported in this paper is the first stage of an experimental investigation of a novel method for generating continuously surfable waves utilizing a moving pressure source. The aim was to measure and assess the waves generated by two parabolic pressure sources and a wedge-shaped wavedozer (Driscoll, A., and Renilson, M. R., 1980, The Wavedozer. A System of Generating Stationary Waves in a Circulating Water Channel, University of Glasgow, Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, Glasgow, UK) for their suitability for future development of continuous breaking surfable waves. The tests were conducted at the University of Tasmania (UTas) Australian Maritime College (AMC) 100 m long towing tank. The predictions and experimental results for the wave height (H) at different values of depth Froude number (Frh) are presented in this paper. Finally, the preferred pressure source is determined based on the wave making energy efficiency and the quality of the waves for surfing.

Copyright © 2013 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Concept design for the efficient method of generating continuously surfable breaking waves using moving pressure sources

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Fig. 3

Model 09–33 parabolic pressure source of 700 mm length, 300 mm beam, and 500 mm height

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Fig. 4

Model 09–34 parabolic pressure source of 700 mm length, 600 mm beam, and 500 mm height

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Fig. 5

Model 09–35 wavedozer pressure source of 1500 mm length, and 300 mm beam

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Fig. 6

The wave probe setup

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Fig. 7

Coordinates system

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Fig. 8

Wave field coordinates

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Fig. 9

H predicted using Michlet compared to the experimental results versus Frh at WP1 for model 09–34 with 100 mm draft in 500 mm water depth

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Fig. 10

The predicted values compared to the experimental results for H divided by h versus Frh for models 09–33, 09–34, and 09–35 in 500 mm water depth and 100 mm draft

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Fig. 11

Experimental results for H divided by h versus Frh for model 09–35 in 500 mm water depth with 100 mm draft at WP1 (y = 0.75 m), WP2 (y = 1 m) and WP3 (y = 1.25 m)

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Fig. 12

Experimental results for H divided by h versus Frh for model 09–33 at WP2 with 100 mm draft in 200 mm, 500 mm, 600 mm, and 700 mm water depth

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Fig. 13

Experimental results for H at WP1 divided by the cubic root of displacement volume (∇1/3) versus Frh for the models 09–33, 09–34, and 09–35 with 100 mm draft in 500 mm water depth

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Fig. 14

Experimental results for H divided by h versus Frh at WP2 for model 09–33 in 700 mm water depth with 100 mm and 200 mm draft

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Fig. 15

Experimental results for H divided by h versus Frh for models 09–33, 09–34, and 09–35 with 200 mm draft in 600 mm water depth

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Fig. 16

Quality waves generated for model 09–35 in water depth of 600 mm with 200 mm draft at Frh = 0.907

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Fig. 17

Breaking bow wave generated for model 09–33 in water depth of 600 mm with 100 m draft at Frh = 0.8 with wash guard fitted

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