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Research Papers

Contribution of Primary Creep in Modeling the Mechanical Behavior of Polycrystalline Ice

[+] Author and Article Information
G. Aryanpour

Industrial Chair on Atmospheric Icing
of Power Network Equipment (CIGELE)
e-mail: Gholamreza_Aryanpour@uqac.ca

M. Farzaneh

Industrial Chair on Atmospheric Icing
of Power Network Equipment (CIGELE)
e-mail: Masoud_Farzaneh@uqac.ca
University of Quebec at Chicoutimi,
555 Boulevard de l'Université,
Chicoutimi, Québec, G7H 2B1, Canada

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING. Manuscript received May 20, 2011; final manuscript received March 28, 2013; published online June 6, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Walter L. Kuehnlein.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 135(3), 031502 (Jun 06, 2013) (6 pages) Paper No: OMAE-11-1045; doi: 10.1115/1.4024149 History: Received May 20, 2011; Revised March 28, 2013

In most of the models proposed for deformation of ice, in addition to instantaneous elastic and viscoelastic parts, a viscoplastic part is also considered. An expression used for material secondary creep is usually employed to describe the viscoplastic component. In this study, however, another viscoplastic deformation of primary creep type is also considered in addition to the secondary creep. Therefore the permanent contribution of deformation is suggested to consist of primary and secondary creep parts. The existence of the primary creep contribution is investigated and characterized by using experimental results reported in the literature. The identified primary creep contribution is then validated by other available experimental results. Finally, the significance of primary creep in the inelastic behavior will be discussed.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
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Copyright © 2013 by ASME
Topics: Creep , Stress , Ice , Deformation , Modeling
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References

Figures

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Fig. 6

Calculation of four components of axial strain for simple compression of ice at 263 K and loading rate of 0.078 MPa/s. Points are experimental results [6].

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Fig. 7

Calculation of four components of axial strain for simple compression of ice at 263 K and loading rate of 0.24 MPa/s. Points are experimental results [6].

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Calculation of four components of axial strain for simple compression of ice at 263 K and loading rate of 0.0075 MPa/s. Points are experimental results [6].

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Calculation of three components of axial strain for simple compression of ice at 263 K and loading rate of 0.24 MPa/s. Points are experimental results [6].

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Calculation of three components of axial strain for simple compression of ice at 263 K and loading rate of 0.078 MPa/s. Points are experimental results [6].

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Fig. 2

Calculation of 3 components of axial strain for simple compression of ice at 263 K and loading rate of 0.0075 MPa/s. Points are experimental results [6].

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Fig. 1

Linear fitting on the results of Tables 1 and 2

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Fig. 8

Ice creep at 263 K with an axial stress of 0.49 MPa. Points are experimental results [20].

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Fig. 9

Percentage of primary creep in axial inelastic strain of ice for the tests cited in Table 3

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Fig. 10

Creep test at axial stress equal to 0.5 MPa. The solid curve shows the contribution of primary creep in axial inelastic strain.

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Fig. 11

Creep test at axial stress equal to 1.0 MPa. The solid curve shows the contribution of primary creep in axial inelastic strain.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Creep test at axial stress equal to 1.5 MPa. The solid curve shows the contribution of primary creep in axial inelastic strain.

Tables

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