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Research Papers: Offshore Technology

Penetration and Removal of the Mooring Dolphin Platform With Three Caisson Foundations

[+] Author and Article Information
Puyang Zhang

e-mail: zpy_td@163.com, zpy@tju.edu.cn

Hongyan Ding

Professor
State Key Laboratory of Hydraulic Engineering
Simulation and Safety,
Key Laboratory of Coast Civil Structure Safety,
Ministry of Education,
School of Civil Engineering,
Tianjin University,
Tianjin 300072, China

Conghuan Le

Associate Professor
State Key Laboratory of Hydraulic Engineering
Simulation and Safety,
School of Civil Engineering,
Tianjin University,
Tianjin 300072, China

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING. Manuscript received September 26, 2012; final manuscript received July 8, 2013; published online September 4, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Dong S. Jeng.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 135(4), 041302 (Sep 04, 2013) (10 pages) Paper No: OMAE-12-1096; doi: 10.1115/1.4025145 History: Received September 26, 2012; Revised July 08, 2013

Mooring dolphin platforms (MDPs) with three caisson foundations were installed in the ice-drifting Bohai Sea of China. Before installation, prototype tests of penetration and removal processing were conducted near the design site. To determine the lateral soil pressure and skin friction of the caisson, soil pressure and strain gauge transducers were fixed along the external skirt of caisson B of MDP1. The shaft skin friction was calculated from the strain difference between any two points of the strain gauges. The transducer results indicated that when the soil property determined by unconsolidated and undrained (UU) triaxial tests was used to calculate the unit skin friction resistance, a value of the adhesion factor α of 1.5–2.0 is recommended. The factor α is 1–0.4 during the suction-assisted penetration phase. The lateral earth pressure coefficient K decreased with penetration depth, most likely due to seepage caused by underpressure. In addition, the difference between the measured values obtained from the soil pressure transducers represented the small tilt of MDP1 during the installation phase. The skin friction and lateral earth pressure significantly decreased in the removal phase, 12 h after the penetration phase, mainly due to the soil disturbance caused by suction penetration around the caisson.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Mooring dolphin platform with three bucket foundations (unit: millimeter) (a) Top view (b) Side view

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Fig. 2

Picture of MDP and other structures at Bohai Sea site

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Fig. 3

Layout of transducers on bucket B of MDP1 (unit: millimeter) (a) Soil pressure transducers (b) Strain gauge for skin friction

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Fig. 4

Particle distribution curves

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Fig. 5

Cohesion and friction angle from UU test

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Fig. 6

Sensitivity and over consolidation ratio (OCR) of soils

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Fig. 7

Summary of friction resistance during penetration/removal at test/located site (caisson B)

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Fig. 8

Soil pressure of SP1 during penetration processing on testing site (caisson B)

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Fig. 9

Soil pressure of SP2 during penetration processing on testing site (caisson B)

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Fig. 10

Soil pressure of SP3 during penetration processing on testing site (caisson B)

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Fig. 11

Skin friction of SK1 during penetration processing on testing site (caisson B)

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Fig. 12

Skin friction of SK2 during penetration processing on testing site (caisson B)

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Fig. 13

Skin friction of SK3 during penetration processing on testing site (caisson B)

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Fig. 14

Soil pressure of SP1 during removal processing on testing site (caisson B)

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Fig. 15

Soil pressure of SP2 during removal processing on testing site (caisson B)

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Fig. 16

Soil pressure of SP3 during removal processing on testing site (caisson B)

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Fig. 17

Skin friction based on SK1-03 during removal processing on testing site (caisson B)

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Fig. 18

Skin friction based on SK3-01/02 during removal processing on testing site (caisson B)

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Fig. 19

Skin friction based on SK3-02 with a 6.1 m spacing during removal processing on testing site (caisson B)

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Fig. 20

Soil pressure of SP1 during penetration processing on located site (caisson B)

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Fig. 21

Soil pressure of SP2 during penetration processing on located site (caisson B)

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Fig. 22

Soil pressure of SP3 during penetration processing on located site (caisson B)

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Fig. 23

Skin friction based on SK1-01/03 during penetration processing on located site (caisson B)

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Fig. 24

Skin friction based on SK2-02/03 during penetration processing on located site (caisson B)

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Fig. 25

Skin friction based on SK3-01/02 during penetration processing on located site (caisson B)

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