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Research Papers: Ocean Engineering

Efficient Predictions of Unsteady Viscous Flows Around Bluff Bodies by Aerodynamic Reduced Order Models

[+] Author and Article Information
K. D. Janoyan

Department of Civil and
Environmental Engineering,
Clarkson University,
Potsdam, NY 13699

H. Yadollahi Farsani

Department of Mechanical and
Aeronautical Engineering,
Clarkson University,
Potsdam, NY 13699
Dynamical Systems Laboratory (DSL),
Polytechnic Institute of New York University,
Brooklyn, NY 11201

P. Marzocca

Department of Mechanical and
Aeronautical Engineering,
Clarkson University,
Potsdam, NY 13699

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING Manuscript received May 30, 2012; final manuscript received May 23, 2013; published online October 25, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Solomon Yim.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 136(1), 011101 (Oct 25, 2013) (6 pages) Paper No: OMAE-12-1054; doi: 10.1115/1.4025544 History: Received May 30, 2012; Revised May 23, 2013

This paper describes an efficient reduced order model (ROM) applied in the aerodynamic analysis of bluff bodies. The proposed method, which is based on eigensystem realization algorithm (ERA), uses the impulse response of the system obtained by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis to construct a ROM that can accurately predict the response of the system to any arbitrary input. In order to study the performance of the proposed technique, three different geometries including elliptical and rectangular sections as well as the deck cross section of Great Belt Bridge (GBB) were considered. The aerodynamic coefficients of the impulse responses of the three sections are used to construct the corresponding ROM for each section. Then, the aerodynamic coefficients from an arbitrary sinusoidal input obtained by CFD are compared with the predicted one using the ROM. The results presented illustrate the ability of the proposed technique to predict responses of the systems to arbitrary sinusoidal and other generic inputs, with significant savings in terms of CPU time when compared with most CFD codes. The methodology described in this paper has wide application in many offshore engineering problems where flexible structures interact with unsteady fluid flow, and should be useful in preliminary design, in design optimization, and in control algorithm development.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Deck Cross Section of the Great Belt East Bridge with dimensions in mm (from Ref. [10])

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Fig. 2

Flow vortical structure for 5 deg step change in AOA at nondimensional time steps 80, 120, 160, and 200—elliptical cross section

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Fig. 3

Flow vortical structure for 5 deg step change in AOA at nondimensional time steps 80, 120, 160, and 200—rectangular cross section

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Fig. 4

Flow vortical structure for 5 deg step change in AOA at nondimensional time steps 80, 120, 160, and 200—GBB cross section

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Fig. 5

CL (left) and CM (right) obtained by DVMFLOW for 1 deg step change in angle-of-attack—elliptical section

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Fig. 6

CL (left) and CM (right) obtained by DVMFLOW for 1 deg step change in angle-of-attack—rectangular section

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Fig. 7

CL (left) and CM (right) obtained by DVMFLOW for 1 deg step change in angle-of-attack—GBB section

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Fig. 8

Comparison of CL (left) and CM (right) obtained by DVMFLOW and ROM—elliptical section

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Fig. 9

Comparison of CL (left) and CM (right) obtained by DVMFLOW and ROM—rectangular section

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Fig. 10

Comparison of CL (left) and CM (right) obtained by DVMFLOW and ROM—GBB section

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