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Research Papers: CFD and VIV

Numerical Modeling of the Dynamical Interaction Between Slug Flow and Vortex Induced Vibration in Horizontal Submarine Pipelines

[+] Author and Article Information
Boris M. Bossio V.

Professor
Department of Mechanics,
Universidad Simón Bolívar,
Caracas 1080, Venezuela
e-mail: bossiob@usb.ve

Armando J. Blanco A.

Professor
Department of Mechanics,
Universidad Simón Bolívar,
Caracas 1080, Venezuela
e-mail: ajblanco@usb.ve

Euro L. Casanova M.

Professor
Department of Mechanics,
Universidad Simón Bolívar,
Caracas 1080, Venezuela
e-mail: ecasanov@usb.ve

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING. Manuscript received November 19, 2012; final manuscript received July 11, 2014; published online July 29, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Antonio C. Fernandes.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 136(4), 041803 (Jul 29, 2014) (5 pages) Paper No: OMAE-12-1104; doi: 10.1115/1.4028027 History: Received November 19, 2012; Revised July 11, 2014

Fatigue life of submarines pipelines is known to depend on many factors, e.g., materials, spanning length, vortex induced vibration (VIV), pipe soil-interaction, etc. In the case of VIV, the external flow due to marine currents can generate the well known alternate vortex shedding regime. In this regime, a time-varying pressure distribution over the surface of the pipeline imposes forces upon the pipeline itself, thus producing vibration with a defined frequency. On the other hand, in recent years some authors have shown that slug flow regime may produce a cyclic damage that could reduce in a significant way the fatigue life of submarine pipelines, thus constituting a governing mechanism in their design. In slug flow regime, slugs traveling in the pipe act as moving gravity loads for the pipeline structure, producing a dynamic response, especially important for the free spans. If both frequencies of the before mentioned effects are closer and, in addition, are in the same range of the natural frequency of the pipeline span, resonance effects can be expected to be reinforced and drastic changes in the dynamics of the pipeline could appear. In this work, a first study of the interaction between slug flow induced vibration in horizontal pipelines and cross-flow response due to vortex shedding is presented. The fluid model was based on the classical wake oscillator model. A numerical model based on the finite difference method was implemented for the structure. Two particular extreme cases were modeled to analyze the pipeline dynamics for “small-size” and “large-size” slugs, for a range of marine current velocities. For the case involving small-size slugs, it was observed a near 10% increment in the vibration amplitude (compared to a reference value), while in the case of “large-slugs” the VIV was overweighed by the slug induced vibration (SIV) phenomenon.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Analysis model considering external and internal flow

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Fig. 2

(a) Relative pipeline midpoint displacement in time for different marine current velocities (U), for case II. (b) FFT of relative pipeline midpoint displacement for different marine current velocities (U), for case II.

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Fig. 3

Contour plot of the absolute pipeline midpoint displacement in time, for case II and U = 2.50 m/s

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Fig. 4

Reference pipeline maximum midpoint displacement values for case I around lock-in region

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Fig. 5

Reference pipeline maximum midpoint displacement values for case II around lock-in region

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Fig. 6

Influence of slug flow (75% liquid-to-gas ratio) in maximum pipeline midpoint displacements, for case I

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Fig. 7

Influence of slug flow (50% liquid-to-gas ratio) in maximum pipeline midpoint displacements, for case I

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Fig. 8

Comparison between the inner large-size slug flow and the lock-in effects in pipeline maximum midpoint displacement for case II

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