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Research Papers: Piper and Riser Technology

Bending Behavior of Reinforced Thermoplastic Pipe

[+] Author and Article Information
Yong Bai

Institute of Structural Engineering,
Zhejiang University,
Hangzhou 310058, China
e-mail: baiyong@zju.edu.cn

Binbin Yu

Institute of Structural Engineering,
Zhejiang University,
Hangzhou 310058, China
e-mail: yubinbinqq@yeah.net

Peng Cheng

Institute of Structural Engineering,
Zhejiang University,
Hangzhou 310058, China
e-mail: chengpeng@zju.edu.cn

Nuosi Wang

Institute of Structural Engineering,
Zhejiang University,
Hangzhou 310058, China
e-mail: wangnuosi@gmail.com

Weidong Ruan

Institute of Structural Engineering,
Zhejiang University,
Hangzhou 310058, China
e-mail: a82405733@126.com

Jiwei Tang

Offshore Pipelines and Risers (OPR) Inc.,
Harbin 310058, China
e-mail: jimmy.t@163.com

A. Babapour

Institute of Structural Engineering,
Zhejiang University,
Hangzhou 310058, China
e-mail: abbasbabapour@gmail.com

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING. Manuscript received April 4, 2013; final manuscript received May 16, 2014; published online December 3, 2014. Assoc. Editor: John Halkyard.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 137(2), 021701 (Apr 01, 2015) (11 pages) Paper No: OMAE-13-1030; doi: 10.1115/1.4028904 History: Received April 04, 2013; Revised May 16, 2014; Online December 03, 2014

Reinforced thermoplastic pipe (RTP) is a composite thermoplastic pipe, which is increasingly being used in oil and gas industry. In practical applications, RTPs inevitably experience bending during reeling process and offshore installation. The ovalization instability of RTP under pure bending was investigated. Several fundamental assumptions of RTP were proposed from the engineering application point of view. Then, based on nonlinear ring theory initially proposed by Kyriakides et al., the effect of transverse deformation through the thickness was introduced, and the ovalization growth of cross section during bending was studied according to nonlinear kinematics. The formulation was based on the principle of virtual work and was solved by a numerical solution. Inelastic material behavior of high density polyethylene (HDPE) was included, and a simplified method was proposed to simulate the behavior of fiber reinforced layer. A detailed Abaqus model was established using solid and truss elements to simulate the HDPE layer and reinforced fiber, respectively. The results obtained from the theoretical method were compared with Abaqus simulation results and test data of verification bending experiment and the results show excellent agreement. The proposed methods are helpful for RTP's engineering applications.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Typical construction of RTP

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Fig. 2

An infinite long RTP pipe under pure bending

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Fig. 3

Deformation of the cross section

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Fig. 4

Tensile tests of HDPE samples

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Fig. 5

Stress–strain data of tensile tests

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Fig. 6

Simplification of reinforced layer

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Fig. 7

Flow chart of the calculation procedure

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Fig. 8

Abaqus model of RTP

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Fig. 9

Bending test setup and specimen

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Fig. 10

Comparison of results from bending test, theoretical method, and numerical simulation

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Fig. 12

Effect of wall-thickness

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Fig. 13

Effect of diameter

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Fig. 14

Effect of D/t ratio

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Fig. 15

Effect of initial ovality

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