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Research Papers: Offshore Geotechnics

Poro-Elasto-Plastic Model for the Wave-Induced Liquefaction1

[+] Author and Article Information
C. C. Liao

Department of Civil Engineering,
State Key Laboratory of Ocean Engineering,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: billaday@gmail.com

H. Zhao

Griffith School of Engineering,
Griffith University,
Gold Coast Campus,
Queensland 4222, Australia
e-mail: hongyi.zhao@griffithuni.edu.au

D.-S. Jeng

Professor
Griffith School of Engineering,
Griffith University,
Gold Coast Campus,
Queensland 4222, Australia
Visiting Professor
State Key Laboratory of Ocean Engineering,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: d.jeng@griffith.edu.au

Part of this paper was presented at the 33rd International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering (OMAE2014), June 8–13, 2014, San Francisco, CA (OMAE2014-24480).

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING. Manuscript received September 11, 2014; final manuscript received March 16, 2015; published online April 16, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Colin Leung.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 137(4), 042001 (Aug 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: OMAE-14-1123; doi: 10.1115/1.4030201 History: Received September 11, 2014; Revised March 16, 2015; Online April 16, 2015

In this paper, we presented an integrated numerical model for the wave-induced pore pressures in marine sediments. Two mechanisms of the wave-induced pore pressures were considered. Both elastic components (for oscillatory) and the plastic components (for residual) were integrated to predict the wave-induced excess pore pressures and liquefaction in marine sediments. The proposed two-dimensional (2D) poro-elasto-plastic model can simulate the phenomenon of the pore pressure buildup and dissipation process in a sandy seabed. The proposed model overall agreed well with the previous wave experiments and geo-centrifuge tests. Based on the parametric study, first, we examined the effects of soil and wave characteristics on the pore pressure accumulations and residual liquefaction. Then, a set of analysis on liquefaction potential was presented to show the development of liquefaction zone. Numerical example shows that the pattern of progressive waves-induced liquefaction gradually changes from 2D to one-dimensional (1D), while the standing wave-induced liquefaction stays in a 2D pattern in the whole process.

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References

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Sumer, B. M., 2014, Liquefaction Around Marine Structures, World Scientific, Hackensack, NJ [CrossRef].
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Figures

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Fig. 1

Mechanism of wave-induced oscillatory and residual pore pressure

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Fig. 2

Sketch of waves over a porous seabed

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Fig. 3

Comparison with experimental data [18]

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Fig. 4

Comparison with centrifuge test data [8]

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Fig. 5

Comparison with centrifugal test data [9]

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Fig. 6

Development of pore pressure distribution versus wave cycles for various residual parameter (α) at (x, z) = (0, −2) m

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Fig. 7

Development of pore pressure distribution versus wave cycles for various residual parameter (R) at (x, z) = (0, −2) m

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Fig. 8

Development of pore pressure distribution versus wave cycles for various residual parameter (β) at (x, z) = (0, −2) m

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Fig. 9

Development of pore pressure distribution versus wave cycles for various soil permeability (ks) at (x, z) = (0, −2) m

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Fig. 10

Distribution of residual pore pressures within a sandy bed at z = −5 m for various wave cycles under progressive wave

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Fig. 11

Distribution of residual pore pressures within a sandy bed at z = −5 m for various wave cycles under standing wave

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Fig. 12

Development of pore pressures within a sandy bed at (x, z) = (0, −2) m for various wave steepness

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Fig. 13

Development of liquefied zones at various time under progressive wave

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Fig. 14

Development of liquefied zones with various time under standing wave

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