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Research Papers: Structures and Safety Reliability

Simulation of Multiliquid-Layer Sloshing With Vessel Motion by Using Moving Particle Semi-Implicit Method

[+] Author and Article Information
Kyung Sung Kim

Texas A&M University,
3136 TAMU,
College Station, TX 77843-3136;
Graduate School of Engineering Mastership,
POSTECH
77 Cheongam Ro,
Nam-Gu, Pohang,
Kyungbuk 790-784, Korea
e-mail: kyungsungkim@gmail.com

Moo-Hyun Kim

Texas A&M University,
3136 TAMU,
College Station, TX 77843-3136
e-mail: m-kim3@tamu.edu

Jong-Chun Park

Pusan National University,
2, Busandaehak-ro 63beon-gil,
Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735, Korea
e-mail: jcpark@pnu.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING. Manuscript received September 12, 2014; final manuscript received July 13, 2015; published online August 13, 2015. Editor: Solomon Yim.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 137(5), 051602 (Aug 13, 2015) (12 pages) Paper No: OMAE-14-1124; doi: 10.1115/1.4031103 History: Received September 12, 2014; Revised July 13, 2015

For oil/gas production/processing platforms, multiple liquid layers can exist and their respective sloshing motions can also affect operational effectiveness or platform performance. To numerically simulate those problems, a new multiliquid moving particle simulation (MPS) method is developed. In particular, to better simulate the relevant physics, robust self-buoyancy model, interface searching model, and surface-tension model are developed. The developed multiliquid MPS method is validated by comparisons against experiment in which three-liquid-sloshing experiment and the corresponding linear potential theory are given. The validated multiliquid MPS program is subsequently coupled with a vessel-motion program in time domain to investigate their dynamic-coupling effects. In case of multiple liquid layers, there exists a variety of sloshing natural frequencies for respective interfaces, so the relevant physics can be much more complicated compared with the single-liquid-tank case. The simulation program can also reproduce the detailed small-scale interface phenomenon called Kelvin–Helmholtz instability. The numerical simulations also show that properly designed liquid cargo tank can also function as a beneficial antirolling device.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Wall Pressure history for sway oscillation period (a) T = 1.3 s and (b) 1.5 s

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Fig. 2

RAOs of roll motion at each filling ratio: comparison between simulation and experiment

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Fig. 3

Schematic view for multiliquid sloshing tank

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Fig. 4

Oscillation of interfaces of multiliquid free-decay test at (a) left wall of tank and (b) mid tank

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Fig. 5

Fast Fourier transform (FFT) of interfaces of multiliquid free-decay test at (a) left wall of tank and (b) mid tank

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Fig. 6

RAOs of multiliquid sloshing tank at various frequencies of forced motion (a) bottom, (b) middle, and (c) top interfaces

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Fig. 7

Comparison of simulated interface oscillations with experiment

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Fig 8

Examples of Kelvin–Helmholtz Instability: (a) numerical simulation by Molin et al. [2], (b) experiment by Molin et al. [2], and (c) numerical simulation by present MPS

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Fig. 9

Schematic view of wash-tank for transverse and longitudinal cross sections

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Fig. 10

Oscillation of interfaces of wash-tank at (a) the left wall of the tank and (b) the mid tank

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Fig. 11

FFT of interface elevations for wash-tank at (a) the left wall of the tank and (b) the mid tank

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Fig. 12

Target and generated input wave spectra

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Fig. 13

Time history of vessel displacement for head-sea condition: (a) surge and (b) pitch

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Fig. 14

Interface oscillations for head-sea condition at tank wall

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Fig. 15

Time history of vessel displacement for beam-sea condition: (a) sway and (b) roll

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Fig. 16

Interface oscillations for beam-sea condition at (a) the left wall of the tank and (b) the mid tank

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Fig. 17

FFT result of interface elevation: (a) the left wall of the tank and (b) the mid tank

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Fig. 18

Snapshots of inner liquid cargo in wash-tank

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Fig. 19

Snapshots of inner rigid cargo in wash-tank

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Fig. 20

Comparison of roll time series

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Fig. 21

Comparison of roll RAO

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Fig. 22

Comparison of roll spectra for liquid/solid cargo

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Fig. 23

Target and regenerated input wave spectra for milder sea state

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Fig. 24

Time history of vessel displacement for beam-sea condition: (a) sway and (b) roll

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Fig. 25

Interface oscillations for beam-sea condition at (a) the left wall of the tank and (b) the mid tank

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Fig. 26

FFT result of interface elevation: (a) the left wall of the tank and (b) the mid of the tank

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Fig. 27

Comparison of roll time series

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Fig. 28

Comparison of roll spectra for liquid/solid cargo

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Fig. 29

Comparison of roll RAO for milder sea states

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