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Technical Brief

Optimal Design of Wire Sheave Used in Offshore Drilling Operations

[+] Author and Article Information
Morten L. Løland, Dag Holen, Frode Stakkeland

Division of Drilling and Production Systems,
Cameron Sense,
Andøyfaret 3,
Kristiansand 4623, Norway

Sudath C. Siriwardane

Department of Mechanical, Structural Engineering
and Materials Science,
University of Stavanger,
Stavanger N-4036, Norway
e-mail: sasc.siriwardane@uis.no

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING. Manuscript received January 2, 2015; final manuscript received October 22, 2015; published online November 13, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Myung Hyun Kim.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 138(1), 014501 (Nov 13, 2015) (6 pages) Paper No: OMAE-15-1001; doi: 10.1115/1.4031902 History: Received January 02, 2015; Revised October 22, 2015

This paper presents optimized design geometries of wire sheaves that are used in offshore drilling operations. Seven different design geometries of wire sheaves are considered for this study. The criteria considered in this comparison are utilization ratios of yield and buckling capacities and fatigue life. The constrained used are the self-weight and rotational inertia. The obtained utilization ratios of yield capacity, buckling capacity, and fatigue life against the weight and rotational moment of inertia are finally compared. The comparisons reveal that currently used lightest sheave geometry has very good yield and buckling capacities than all other geometries. But it has high self-weight and rotational inertia. Finally, the web with decreasing thickness which has a lowest rotational inertia is proposed as the most suitable design geometry, if the expected design life is limited to 20 years. Different sheave geometries are also proposed depending on the required design service life.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
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Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Topics: Wire , Design , Pulleys , Stress , Buckling
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Sheave grove geometry [6]

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Fig. 2

Cross-sectional views of seven different sheaves: (a) double web, (b) double web with holes, (c) straight web, (d) straight web with holes, (e) thin web with stiffeners, (f) thin web with stiffeners and holes, and (g) web with decreasing thickness

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Fig. 3

von Mises equivalent stress contours of seven different sheaves: (a) double web, (b) double web with holes, (c) straight web, (d) straight web with holes, (e) thin web with stiffeners, (f) thin web with stiffeners and holes, and (g) web with decreasing thickness

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Fig. 4

First mode of buckling of seven different sheaves: (a) double web, (b) double web with holes, (c) straight web, (d) straight web with holes, (e) thin web with stiffeners, (f) thin web with stiffeners and holes, and (g) web with decreasing thickness

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Fig. 5

The absolute values of maximum principle stresses in which direction is more or less normal to the weld toe/cast joint: (a) double web, (b) double web with holes, (c) straight web, (d) straight web with holes, (e) thin web with stiffeners, (f) thin web with stiffeners and holes, and (g) web with decreasing thickness

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