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Research Papers: CFD and VIV

Computational and Experimental Assessment of Turbulence Stimulation on Flow Induced Motion of a Circular Cylinder

[+] Author and Article Information
Omer Kemal Kinaci

Assistant Professor
YTU Naval Architecture and Marine
Engineering Department,
Yildiz Technical University,
Barbaros Bulvari,
Besiktas, Istanbul 34349, Turkey;
Marine Renewable Energy Laboratory,
University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
e-mail: kinaci@yildiz.edu.tr

Sami Lakka

Lakka Technologies,
Vatsoilantie 3,
Lempäälä 37500, Finland;
Marine Renewable Energy Laboratory,
University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
e-mail: sami.lakka@gmail.com

Hai Sun

Assistant Professor
College of Aerospace and Civil Engineering,
Harbin Engineering University,
Harbin 150009, China;
Marine Renewable Energy Laboratory,
University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor MI 48109
e-mail: hais@umich.edu

Ethan Fassezke

Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering,
University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48554
e-mail: ethandf@umich.edu

Michael M. Bernitsas

Professor
CVortex Hydro Energy,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109;
Marine Renewable Energy Laboratory,
University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
e-mail: michaelb@umich.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING. Manuscript received September 9, 2015; final manuscript received May 2, 2016; published online June 2, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Ye Li.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 138(4), 041802 (Jun 02, 2016) (9 pages) Paper No: OMAE-15-1096; doi: 10.1115/1.4033637 History: Received September 09, 2015; Revised May 02, 2016

Vortex-induced vibrations (VIVs) are highly nonlinear and it is hard to approach the problem analytically or computationally. Experimental investigation is therefore essential to address the problem and reveal some physical aspects of VIV. Although computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) offers powerful methods to generate solutions, it cannot replace experiments as yet. When used as a supplement to experiments, however, CFD can be an invaluable tool to explore some underlying issues associated with such complicated flows that could otherwise be impossible or very expensive to visualize or measure experimentally. In this paper, VIVs and galloping of a cylinder with selectively distributed surface roughness—termed passive turbulence control (PTC)—are investigated experimentally and computationally. The computational approach is first validated with benchmark experiments on smooth cylinders available in the literature. Then, experiments conducted in the Marine Renewable Energy Laboratory (MRELab) of the University of Michigan are replicated computationally to visualize the flow and understand the effects of thickness and width of roughness strips placed selectively on the cylinder. The major outcomes of this work are: (a) Thicker PTC initiates earlier galloping but wider PTC does not have a major impact on the response of the cylinder and (b) The amplitude response is restricted in VIV due to the dead fluid zone attached to the cylinder, which is not observed in galloping.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Cylinder with PTC located at 30−46  deg

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Fig. 2

Portion of the grid structure

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Fig. 3

Close-up view of the grid in the cylinder vicinity

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Fig. 4

Validation of the computational approach with experiments [21]

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Fig. 5

Amplitude response of smooth cylinder versus PTC-cylinders with variable PTC thickness

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Fig. 6

Frequency response of smooth cylinder versus PTC-cylinders with variable PTC thickness

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Fig. 7

Effect of PTC coverage in amplitude response

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Fig. 8

Effect of PTC coverage in frequency response

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Fig. 9

Four quadrants of the cylinder (left). Pressure coefficient distribution along the cylinder with PTC P60 and P180 at U*=14 (right).

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Fig. 10

Velocity vectors at U*=7 for PTC P60 − 16  deg coverage (left). Zoomed in version (right).

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Fig. 11

Velocity vectors at U*=14 for PTC P60 − 16  deg coverage (left). Zoomed in version (right).

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Fig. 12

Velocity vectors at U*=7 for PTC P60 − 8  deg coverage (left). Zoomed in version (right).

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Fig. 13

Velocity vectors at U*=14 for PTC P60 − 8  deg coverage (left). Zoomed in version (right).

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