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Research Papers: Ocean Space Utilization

The Physical Behavior of Seine Ropes for Evaluating Demersal Seine Fishing1

[+] Author and Article Information
Nina A. H. Madsen

SINTEF Fisheries and Aquaculture AS,
Willesmoesvej 2,
Hirtshals 9850, Denmark
e-mail: nina.madsen@sintef.no

Karl Gunnar Aarsæther

SINTEF Fisheries and Aquaculture AS,
Postbox 4762 Sluppen,
Trondheim 7465, Norway
e-mail: karl.gunnar.aarsather@sintef.no

Bent Herrmann

SINTEF Fisheries and Aquaculture AS,
Willesmoesvej 2,
Hirtshals 9850, Denmark
e-mail: bent.herrmann@sintef.no

Kurt Hansen

SINTEF Fisheries and Aquaculture AS,
Willesmoesvej 2,
Hirtshals 9850, Denmark
e-mail: kurt.hansen@sintef.no

Jørgen H. Jensen

SINTEF Fisheries and Aquaculture AS,
Postbox 4762 Sluppen,
Trondheim 7465, Norway
e-mail: jorgen.jensen@sintef.no

2Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING. Manuscript received July 31, 2015; final manuscript received May 27, 2016; published online June 28, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Myung Hyun Kim.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 138(5), 051201 (Jun 28, 2016) (10 pages) Paper No: OMAE-15-1078; doi: 10.1115/1.4033778 History: Received July 31, 2015; Revised May 27, 2016

Demersal seining is an active bottom fishing method, which applies seine ropes and a seine net. The seine ropes and net are laid out on the fishing ground with the seine ropes encircling an aggregation of fish on the seabed. The area on the seabed encircled by the seine ropes is typical much larger than the swept area that will be covered by the seine net during the fishing process. Therefore, the catching performance of a demersal seine depends on the efficiency by which the seine ropes are able to herd the fish into and maintain them in the path of the net until they are overtaken by it in the late stages of the fishing process. This article describes flume tank experiments to validate a numerical model. This model simulates the physical behavior of seine ropes during the fishing process. The experiments are conducted for varying physical properties of the ropes and for different layout patterns. The seine ropes are hauled back at different speeds. A motion tracking system, based on stereo vision, is applied to record the gradual change in the area encircled by the ropes. The experimental results from the flume tank are compared with data obtained using the simulation model. Finally, the validated simulation model is applied for predictions.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Demersal seine haul-back procedure [3]

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Fig. 2

Photo from the flume tank illustrating the data acquisition principle. The inset shows the reflective markers sewn onto the rope.

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Fig. 3

Screen dump of the qualisys software, showing the time traces of the movement for the individual markers during the haul back of the seine ropes

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Fig. 4

Photos of the three initial layout patterns applied in the flume tank experiments. From top: square, diamond, and triangle.

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Fig. 5

Constraint formulation of rigid body dynamics for a single element

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Fig. 6

Constraint for continuity of a hinged structure

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Fig. 7

Numerical seine cable model shown in fhsim. The cables are retracted at the top of the image, while the clump is seen in the lower left corner.

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Fig. 8

Experimental obtained seine rope patterns during flume tank experiments. Odd rows: combination rope, and even rows: polyester rope. Odd columns: light net clump, and even columns: heavy net clump. The first two columns show slow winch speed, the last two columns fast winch speed. Each picture corresponds to an area being 8 m wide and 9.5 m long. The labels correspond to the experimental cases described in Table 1. The circle markers are the measured points on the seine rope, and the solid line is connecting these measured points such that the time development of the experiment can be followed. The time interval between the paths shown (each solid line) is 10 s for the first two columns, for the slow winch speeds. The last two columns are for the fast winch speed experiments. Here, the time interval between paths shown is 5 s.

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Fig. 9

Simulations (solid lines) compared to flume tank experiments (circular markers) for the three different initial layout patterns: square (top), diamond (center), and triangle (bottom). The time interval in the “movie clips” are 6 s for the diamond pattern, while it is 8 s for the two other. Experimental case nos. 1, 9, and 17 (Table 1 and Fig. 8). Each plot in the figure of paths seen from above represents an area of 8 m wide and 9.5 m long, for plots of paths seen from the side, the area represents 2.7 m depth by 9.5 m.

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Fig. 10

The top rows show the combination rope with interval of 10 s time interval. The bottom rows the polyester rope, also with 10 s time intervals. The lines represent simulations, while the circle markers represent the flume tank results. Experimental cases 2 and 6 (Table 1 and Fig. 8). Each plot in the figure of paths seen from above represents an area of 8 m wide and 9.5 m long, for plots of paths seen from the side the area represents 2.7 m depth by 9.5 m.

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Fig. 11

Simulated seine rope behavior for combination rope (circle markers) versus polyester (solid lines) with slow winch speed (0.157 m/s). The net clump was 161 g. Each plot in the figure of paths seen from above represents an area of 8 m wide and 9.5 m long, for plots of paths seen from the side, the area represents 2.7 m depth by 9.5 m. The time interval between plots is 10 s.

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Fig. 12

Simulated seine rope behavior for combination rope (circle markers) versus polyester rope (solid lines) with slow winch speed (0.157 m/s). The net clump was 1.6 kg. Each plot in the figure of paths seen from above represents an area of 8 m wide and 9.5 m long, for plots of paths seen from the side, the area represents 2.7 m depth by 9.5 m. The time interval between plots is 10 s.

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Fig. 13

Simulation with friction coefficient set at 0.25 (circle markers) versus set at 1.0 (solid lines) for the combination rope with slow winch speed (0.157 m/s). Net clump was 161 g. Each plot in the figure of paths seen from above represents an area of 8 m wide and 9.5 m long, for plots of paths seen from the side, the area represent s2.7 m depth by 9.5 m. The time interval between plots is 10 s.

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Fig. 14

Simulated seine rope behavior for a combination rope assuming bending stiffness scale at 2 × 10−3 (circle markers) versus 1 × 10−1 (solid lines) with slow winch speed (0.157 m/s). The net clump was 1.6 kg. Each plot in the figure of paths seen from above represents an area of 8 m wide and 9.5 m long, for plots of paths seen from the side, the area represents 2.7 m depth by 9.5 m. The time interval between plots is 10 s.

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