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Research Papers: Ocean Engineering

Finite Element Cold Bending Residual Stress Evaluation on Submarine Pressure Hull Instability Assessment

[+] Author and Article Information
Paulo Rogério Franquetto

Navy Technology Center in São Paulo,
Avenida Professor Lineu Prestes, 2468,
São Paulo, SP, 05508-000, Brazil
e-mail: paulo.franquetto@ctmsp.mar.mil.br

Miguel Mattar Neto

Energetic and Nuclear Research Institute,
Avenida Professor Lineu Prestes, 2242,
São Paulo, SP, 05508-000, Brazil
e-mail: mmattar@usp.br

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING. Manuscript received January 16, 2016; final manuscript received June 27, 2016; published online July 29, 2016. Editor: Solomon Yim.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 138(6), 061101 (Jul 29, 2016) (12 pages) Paper No: OMAE-16-1004; doi: 10.1115/1.4034076 History: Received January 16, 2016; Revised June 27, 2016

During the pressure hull manufacturing, processes like cold bending and welding are often applied. These processes lead to permanent plastic deformations which are associated with residual stresses. The presence of residual stresses is equivalent to the introduction of an initial preload in the structure, which accelerates the plastification process, decreasing pressure hull resistance. To quantify this reduction, a case study that considers residual stresses due to cold bending on hull plates and frame flanges had been performed using finite element models. The study encompasses hull diameters of 6, 8, and 10 m with hull plates and frame flange thickness from 20 to 30 mm, with HY100 steel. Finite element numerical analyses were done considering material and geometric nonlinearities. First, the cold bending residual stresses were determined using finite element models. Then, these cold bending residual stresses were introduced as initial stresses in the submarine pressure hulls' finite element models. In the end, it was possible to verify that the presence of cold bending residual stress reduces the submarine hull collapse pressure up to 4.3%.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic representation of the pressure hull analyzed, dimensions in millimeters

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Fig. 9

Circumferential residual stress profile through the 6-m diameter hull plate for different thicknesses

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Fig. 10

Longitudinal residual stress profile through the 6-m diameter hull plate for different thicknesses

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Fig. 11

Circumferential residual stress profile through the 8-m diameter hull plate for different thicknesses

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Fig. 12

Longitudinal residual stress profile through the 8-m diameter hull plate for different thicknesses

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Fig. 13

Circumferential residual stress profile through the 10-m diameter hull plate for different thicknesses

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Fig. 14

Longitudinal residual stress profile through the 10-m diameter hull plate for different thicknesses

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Fig. 8

Circumferential (hoop) residual stress profile for different integration points quantity

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Fig. 7

Maximum circumferential and longitudinal residual stress variations for different mesh sizes

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Fig. 6

UY displacement for the 30-mm thick pressure hull plate with an 35 deg angular sector, in meters

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Fig. 5

Maximum circumferential residual stress for different angular sectors (θ)

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Fig. 4

Boundary conditions used for frame flange cold bending process

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Fig. 3

Boundary conditions used for hull plate cold bending process

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Fig. 2

Schematic representation of θ, Larc, and Dy parameters

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Fig. 23

von Mises equivalent stress evolution during the cold bending process for plates 20 and 30 thick for the 6-m diameter pressure hull

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Fig. 22

Maximum circumferential residual stress for different frame flange thicknesses and hull diameters

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Fig. 21

Maximum circumferential residual stress for different hull plate thicknesses and hull diameters

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Fig. 20

Longitudinal residual stress profile through the 10-m diameter hull frame flange for different thicknesses

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Fig. 19

Circumferential residual stress profile through the 10-m diameter hull frame flange for different thicknesses

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Fig. 18

Longitudinal residual stress profile through the 8-m diameter hull frame flange for different thicknesses

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Fig. 17

Circumferential residual stress profile through the 8-m diameter hull frame flange for different thicknesses

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Fig. 16

Longitudinal residual stress profile through the 6-m diameter hull frame flange for different thicknesses

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Fig. 15

Circumferential residual stress profile through the 6-m diameter hull frame flange for different thicknesses

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Fig. 24

Boundary conditions for nonlinear buckling analysis

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Fig. 25

Example of load x radial displacement curve

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Fig. 26

Reduction pressure factor for different pressure geometrics

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Fig. 27

Inertia and reduction pressure factor for different pressure geometrics

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Fig. 28

Typical buckling mode, displacement in meters

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Fig. 29

Typical equivalent von Mises stress distribution at the collapse point, in Pascal

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