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Research Papers: Ocean Engineering

Norming Maneuverability in Adverse Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
Vladimir Shigunov

DNVGL,
Brooktorkai 18,
Hamburg 20457, Germany
e-mail: vladimir.shigunov@dnvgl.com

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING. Manuscript received July 6, 2015; final manuscript received July 9, 2016; published online October 3, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Robert Seah.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 139(1), 011101 (Oct 03, 2016) (10 pages) Paper No: OMAE-15-1064; doi: 10.1115/1.4034201 History: Received July 06, 2015; Revised July 09, 2016

Slow steaming and regulatory drive toward more energy efficient ships have raised a problem of ensuring sufficient maneuverability of ships under adverse weather conditions when installed power is reduced. This paper discusses possible criteria for maneuverability in adverse conditions, proposes practical assessment procedure, and shows examples of its application. Further, the paper outlines necessary developments.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Number of vessels at anchor as percentage of the initial number of anchored vessels versus significant wave height during an increasing storm according to data in Ref. [15]

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Fig. 2

Environmental conditions from interviews. Top: wind force during leaving coastal areas (○) and during encountering steering and propulsion problems in coastal areas and in the open sea (•); bottom: corresponding significant wave height (○ and •, respectively).

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Fig. 3

Coordinate system and definitions

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Fig. 4

Examples of assessment results in polar coordinates ship speed (radial coordinate)—seaway direction (circumferential coordinate, head waves, and wind come from the top): line “required power equal to available power” (line A), line “advance speed 4.0 knots” (line B) and line “rudder angle 25 deg” (line C) for the following situations (from left to right): first, installed power is sufficient to fulfill both criteria C2 and C3 (line A does not cross lines B and C); second, installed power is marginally sufficient to provide advance speed (line A crosses line B) in head seaway, and (third) in bow-quartering seaway; and fourth, installed power is marginally sufficient for steering ability in beam seaway (line A crosses line C)

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Fig. 5

Ratio of required to available delivered power from assessment according to steering ability (C2) and advance speed (C3) criteria for a container ship (top) and VLCC (bottom) in waves, in wind, and in combined waves and wind

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Fig. 6

Quadratic transfer functions of Xd (left), Yd (middle), and Nd (right) versus wave frequency ω (rad/s) for a single-point moored tanker in 45 deg off-bow waves from GL Rankine computations (lines) and experiments [31] (symbols)

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Fig. 7

dYR/dδ (N/rad) versus propeller thrust (N) for tanker at forward speed 5.0 (left), 7.5 (middle), and 10.0 (right) knots according to models [32] (—) and [33] (- - -) compared to measurements [34] at rudder angle 10 (▲) and 20 (□) deg

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Fig. 8

YR (kN) versus propeller thrust (kN) and rudder angle on a twisted rudder of 14,000 TEU container ship DTC [29] from RANSE-CFD simulations (symbols) and model [32] (lines) at rudder angles 0, 10, and 20 deg and drift angles of the ship of 0 (left), 7.5 (middle), and 15 (right) deg

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Fig. 9

Ratio of required delivered power to available delivered power according to steering ability (C2) and advance speed (C3) criteria for container ship (left) and VLCC (right) with original and 30%-increased and 30%-reduced maximum lift coefficient of rudder

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Fig. 10

Diesel engine diagram

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