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Research Papers: Ocean Renewable Energy

Effects of Blade Pitch, Rotor Yaw, and Wind–Wave Misalignment on a Large Offshore Wind Turbine Dynamics in Western Gulf of Mexico Shallow Water in 100-Year Return Hurricane

[+] Author and Article Information
Ling Ling Yin

National Wind Energy Center,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Cullen College of Engineering,
University of Houston,
5000 Gulf Freeway,
Houston, TX 77023

King Him Lo

National Wind Energy Center,
Cullen College of Engineering,
University of Houston,
5000 Gulf Freeway,
Houston, TX 77023

Su Su Wang

National Wind Energy Center,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Cullen College of Engineering,
University of Houston,
5000 Gulf Freeway,
Houston, TX 77023
e-mail: sswang@uh.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING. Manuscript received August 6, 2015; final manuscript received July 23, 2016; published online September 16, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Yi-Hsiang Yu.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 139(1), 011901 (Sep 16, 2016) (10 pages) Paper No: OMAE-15-1084; doi: 10.1115/1.4034330 History: Received August 06, 2015; Revised July 23, 2016

To determine the optimal park configuration of a large offshore turbine in a hurricane, a study is conducted on effects of blade pitch and rotor yaw, and wind–wave misalignment, in a 100-year return hurricane on a 13.2-MW large offshore wind turbine (OWT) in western Gulf of Mexico (GOM) shallow water. The OWT structure considered includes a rotor with three 100-m long blades and a monotower support structure. Maximum loads on the wind turbine are determined with blade pitch and rotor yaw, with and without wind–wave misalignment in the 100-year return hurricane. The results show that effects of blade pitch and rotor yaw on turbine structural dynamics are significant, whereas the effect of wind–wave misalignment is small in the context of structural design in strength. The study provides deep insight to wind turbine dynamics and its structural design in the extreme hurricane.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Directions of waves and wind with 90 deg wind–wave misalignment

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Fig. 2

RNA of 13.2-MW wind turbine

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Fig. 3

Geometry of the 13.2-MW turbine tower (not to scale)

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Fig. 4

Geometry of monopile substructure (not to scale)

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Fig. 5

Structural dynamics models of the 13.2-MW offshore wind turbine

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Fig. 6

Effects of tower element number nt on (a) mud-line overturning moment, My and (b) tower-top fore–aft displacement, Ux(t) (t = 20 mins)

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Fig. 7

Effects of time increment Δt  on (a) mud-line tower overturning moment, My and (b) tower-top fore–aft displacement, Ux(t) (t = 20 mins)

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Fig. 8

Effects of blade element number  nb  on (a) blade-tip out-of-plane displacement, Ux(bt) and (b) blade-tip out-of-plane displacement history during 20 mins hurricane

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Fig. 9

Effects of pitch angle on (a) mud-line overturning moment, M, (b) tower-top fore–aft deflection, Ux(t), (c) rotor thrust along the shaft, T, and (d) blade-tip out-of-plane displacement, Ux(bt)

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Fig. 10

Time history of angle of attack when all blades pitching to 60 deg

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Fig. 11

Time history of angle of attack when all blades pitching to 0 deg

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Fig. 12

Aerodynamic coefficients of the DU25 airfoil [13]

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Fig. 13

Effects of rotor yaw on (a) mud-line tower overturning moment, M, (b) tower-top fore–aft deflection, Ux(t), (c) rotor thrust along the shaft, T, and (d) blade-tip out-of-plane displacement, Ux(bt)

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Fig. 14

Angle of attack in the 13.2-MW wind turbine in 100-year return hurricane when all blades pitch to 0 deg and rotor yaw to 70 deg during a 20 mins time-domain simulation

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Fig. 15

Angle of attack history in the 13.2-MW wind turbine in 100-year return hurricane when all blades pitch to 0 deg and rotor yaw to 60 deg during a 20 mins time-domain simulation

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Fig. 16

Effects of wind–wave misalignment on (a) mud-line tower overturning moment, M, (b) tower-top fore–aft deflection, Ux(t), (c) rotor thrust along the shaft, T, (d) blade-tip out-of-plane displacement, Ux(bt), (e) mud-line fore–aft tower shear force, Vx, (f) mud-line tower side–side shear force, Vy, (g) ratio of tower side–side and fore–aft shear force, and (h) ratio of tower fore–aft and side–side shear force

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Fig. 17

Natural frequencies of turbine towers with different sizes in normal and extreme hurricane sea states

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Fig. 18

Campbell diagram for different turbine configurations and designs

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