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Research Papers: Polar and Arctic Engineering

Assessment of Flexure Failure Models Using Loads Measured on the Conical Piers of the Confederation Bridge During 1998–2008

[+] Author and Article Information
Chee K. Wong

Department of Civil Engineering,
Schulich School of Engineering,
University of Calgary,
2500 University Drive, N.W.,
Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada
e-mail: wongck@ucalgary.ca

Thomas G. Brown, J. Susan Robertson

Department of Civil Engineering,
Schulich School of Engineering,
University of Calgary,
2500 University Drive, N.W.,
Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING. Manuscript received October 13, 2015; final manuscript received August 12, 2016; published online October 10, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Søren Ehlers.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 139(1), 011502 (Oct 10, 2016) (10 pages) Paper No: OMAE-15-1105; doi: 10.1115/1.4034527 History: Received October 13, 2015; Revised August 12, 2016

The Confederation Bridge spans across the Northumberland Strait in Eastern Canada connecting Prince Edward Island to mainland Canada through New Brunswick. Due to the presence of ice during each winter, the bridge piers are subjected to ice loads. A comprehensive permanent monitoring program has been implemented to observe and measure the ice–structure interaction events at two piers since the start of the bridge operations in 1998. This study uses the derived ice loads on one pier, and the associated event attributes for 100 selected events. Flexural failure models are used to determine theoretical loads of the selected interaction events. It is found that the weight of the total ice rubble pile and the physical and mechanical properties of the ice sheet are the dominant parameters affecting the ice load exerted on the conical structure. A semi-empirical correlation is developed to relate the ice load with those parameters for the Confederation Bridge.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Instrumented pier 31, Confederation Bridge [1]

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Fig. 2

Ice rubble pile formation at the Confederation Bridge pier [4]

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Fig. 3

Example of a building load, an indicator of a potential flexural failure event [4]

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Fig. 4

Distribution of measured event trigger loads [4]

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Fig. 5

Ice sheet thickness measurement [4]

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Fig. 6

Ice rubble pile measurement [4]

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Fig. 8

(a) Measured ice load versus ice sheet thickness and (b) measured ice load versus effective ice sheet thickness

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Fig. 9

Idealized rubble pile with horizontal upper surface

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Fig. 10

Measured ice load versus total ice rubble pile weight

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Fig. 11

Measured ice load versus ice sheet velocity

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Fig. 12

Measured ice load versus predicted ice load by Ralston [10]

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Fig. 13

Measured ice load versus predicted ice load by Nevel [12]

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Fig. 14

Measured ice load versus predicted ice load by Croasdale et al. [11]

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Fig. 15

Measured ice load versus predicted ice load by Mayne [9]

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Fig. 16

Measured ice load versus predicted ice load by Croasdale et al. [11], Mayne [9], and Wong [13] for ten events

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Fig. 17

Predicted ice load by Ralston [10] versus total ice pile weight

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Fig. 18

Predicted ice load by Ralston [10] versus σtt2

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Fig. 19

Predicted ice load by Nevel [12] versus total ice pile weight

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Fig. 20

Predicted ice load by Nevel [12] versus σtt2

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Fig. 21

Predicted ice load by Croasdale et al. [11] versus total ice pile weight

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Fig. 22

Predicted ice load by Croasdale et al. [11] versus σtt2

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Fig. 23

Predicted ice load by Mayne [9] versus total ice pile weight

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Fig. 24

Predicted ice load by Mayne [9] versus σtt2

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Fig. 25

Rubble weight–ice sheet flexural strength parameter versus measured ice load

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