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Research Papers: Structures and Safety Reliability

The Underwater Blast Resistance of Sacrificial Claddings With Stepwise Graded Cellular Cores

[+] Author and Article Information
Caiyu Yin

State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: yincaiyu@sjtu.edu.cn

Zeyu Jin

State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: jinzeyu@sjtu.edu.cn

Yong Chen

State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: chenyong@sjtu.edu.cn

Hongxing Hua

State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: hhx@sjtu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING. Manuscript received July 6, 2016; final manuscript received September 24, 2016; published online November 29, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Jonas W. Ringsberg.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 139(2), 021602 (Nov 29, 2016) (10 pages) Paper No: OMAE-16-1077; doi: 10.1115/1.4034922 History: Received July 06, 2016; Revised September 24, 2016

One-dimensional (1D) analytical model and finite element (FE) simulation are employed to investigate the shock mitigation capability of stepwise graded cellular claddings to underwater blast. To build the analytical model, two types of core configurations are considered: (i) “low → high” with the weakest layer being placed at the impinged end and (ii) the “high → low” configuration. Details of fluid–structure interaction (FSI), response of the graded cladding, and the cavitation phenomenon are thoroughly studied. Then the fidelity of the analytical model is assessed by FE simulations. The results reveal that the analytical model can accurately predict the whole process of such problem. Subsequently, the validated analytical models are used to analyze the influence of density gradient on the shock mitigation capability of cellular claddings in terms of the densification loading, the partial impulse imparted to the cladding, and the work done on the cladding by the external impulse. The results illustrate that the graded claddings perform better than the equivalent uniform case. Compared with the negative density gradient case, the “low → high” configuration with weaker layer being placed at the impinged end is preferable since lower force is transmitted to the protected structure.

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Figures

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Fig. 5

(a) Schematic of a cellular cladding subjected to water blast, (b) idealized RPPL nominal stress–strain curve of cellular materials, and (c) initiation and evolution of the cavitation

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Fig. 4

Typical time history of different layers' velocity for configuration 2

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Fig. 3

Deformation profile of stepwise graded cellular cladding: (a) configuration 1, (b) configuration 2, (c) configuration 3, and (d) configuration 4

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Fig. 2

Sketch of 1D stepwise graded cellular cladding subject to water blast

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Fig. 1

The potential schematic map of using sacrificial cellular cladding as the protective structures of ship hulls or submersible structures

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Fig. 9

Typical deformation process of the “low → high” configuration, ψ=96, ρ¯u=0.3, σ¯u=0.1, εd(0)=0.7, p0=pref=30 MPa : (a) time histories of the position of wave front and (b) the total pressure at the wet face

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Fig. 10

Typical deformation process of the “high → low” configuration, ψ=96, ρ¯u=0.3, σ¯u=0.1, εd(0)=0.7, p0=pref=30 MPa : (a) time histories of the position of wave fronts and (b) the total pressure at the wet face

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Fig. 6

Effects of nondimensional core strength on (a) the propagation of breaking fronts and closing fronts and (b) the spatial cavitation velocity distribution in cavitated region. The FSI parameter ψ=19.

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Fig. 7

Typical time histories of pressure with varying core strength: (a) the actual incident wave and (b) the total pressure at the wet face. The FSI parameter ψ=19.

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Fig. 8

(a) The sketch of a cellular cladding with stepwise graded core of identical dimensions, (b) propagation of the wave front for the “low → high” configuration, and (c) propagation of the wave front for the “high → low” configuration

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Fig. 11

Temporal evolution of interface pressure and the velocity of the wetted face sheet: (a) equivalent uniform case, (b) “low → high” configuration, and (c) “high → low” configuration

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Fig. 12

(a) The maximum reaction force and the densification pressure versus the gradation coefficient and (b) undensified part of the cladding versus the gradation coefficient. It is assumed that the properties of the equivalent uniform core are ρ¯u=0.3, σ¯u=0.1, εd(0)=0.7 and the FSI parameter ψ=96.

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Fig. 13

(a) The space distribution of dimensionless dynamic stress behind the wave front under p0=pref=30 MPa and (b) the work done on the cladding by the external impulse versus the gradation coefficient. It is assumed that the properties of the equivalent uniform core are ρ¯u=0.3, σ¯u=0.1, and εd(0)=0.7 and the FSI parameter is ψ=96.

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Fig. 14

Dimensionless partial impulse versus the gradation coefficient. It is assumed that the properties of the equivalent uniform core are ρ¯u=0.3, σ¯u=0.1, and εd(0)=0.7 and the FSI parameter is ψ=96.

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