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Research Papers: CFD and VIV

Cross-Flow Vortex-Induced Vibration Simulation of Flexible Risers Employing Structural Systems of Different Nonlinearities With a Wake Oscillator

[+] Author and Article Information
Shuai Meng

State Key Laboratory of Ocean Engineering,
Collaborative Innovation Center for
Advanced Ship and Deep-Sea Exploration,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: mengshuai001@sjtu.edu.cn

Xuefeng Wang

State Key Laboratory of Ocean Engineering,
Collaborative Innovation Center for
Advanced Ship and Deep-Sea Exploration,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: wangxuef@sjtu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING. Manuscript received August 6, 2016; final manuscript received November 17, 2016; published online March 27, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Robert Seah.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 139(3), 031801 (Mar 27, 2017) (7 pages) Paper No: OMAE-16-1090; doi: 10.1115/1.4035306 History: Received August 06, 2016; Revised November 17, 2016

To achieve a reliable structural model for vortex-induced vibration (VIV) the prediction of flexible risers, this paper employs structural systems with different geometrical nonlinearities (including a linear structure, a nonlinear one, a coupled cross-flow, and axial nonlinear one) and a classical oscillator to simulate cross-flow VIV. By comparing the experimental and simulation results, it is found that when the drag coefficient is assumed to be a fixed constant along the cylinder (i.e., the damping model is linear function of current velocity), it can affect the vibration amplitude considerably and may alter the dominant modes. When the excited mode of VIV is bending-stiffness dominant, the cross-flow structural nonlinearities can have a profound stiffening effect on vibration response. Although the introduction of axial deformation can reduce this function, the coupled cross-flow and axial nonlinearities still have the effect of decreasing the VIV amplitude.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

A diagram of a flexible riser exposed to an incoming current

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Fig. 2

The fundamental frequencies of (a) riser 1 (the first fournatural frequencies given in Ref. [12] are f1 = 2.27 Hz, f2 = 5.01 Hz, f3 = 8.57 Hz, and f4 = 13.15 Hz) and (b) riser 2 (fn, Galerkin is the calculated frequencies based on Galerkin method)

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Fig. 3

Simulations of riser 1 employing model A at CD=0.8, 1.2, and 2.0: (a) Ue = 0.4 m/s and (b) Ue = 2.8 m/s

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Fig. 4

Simulations of riser 2 when Ue=0.4 m/s employing model A at CD=0.8, 1.2, and 2.0

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Fig. 5

Simulations of riser 1 when Ue=0.4 m/s employing model A, model B, and model C at CD=0.8

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Fig. 6

Simulations of riser 1 when Ue=2.8 m/s employing model B, and model C at CD=0.8, 1.2, and 2.0: (a) model B and (b) model C

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Fig. 7

Simulations of riser 2 when Ue=0.4 m/s employing model A, model B, and model C at CD=1.2

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Fig. 8

Simulations of riser 1 when Ue=0.4 m/s, T0=0 employing model A, model B, and model C at CD=0.8

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Fig. 9

Simulations of riser 2 when Ue=2.8 m/s, T0=0 employing model A, model B, and model C at CD=1.2

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