0
research-article

Velocity effect on the bending failure of ice sheets against wide sloping structures

[+] Author and Article Information
Wang Yihe

Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering The National University of Singapore Block E1A, #07-03 No.1 Engineering Drive 2 Singapore 117576
ceewyh@nus.edu.sg

Poh Leong Hien

Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering The National University of Singapore Block E1A, #07-03 No.1 Engineering Drive 2 Singapore 117576
leonghien@nus.edu.sg

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4036478 History: Received January 16, 2017; Revised April 08, 2017

Abstract

Sloping structures are widely used in ice-infested waters because of their ability to reduce ice loading, by inducing a bending failure in ice sheets. From model test data, a significant velocity effect on the breaking load of ice sheets has been reported. In this paper, the ice-fluid interaction process is investigated by adopting the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory for ice sheet, and the potential theory for the underlying fluid domain. Accounting for the inertia effect of ice sheet and the hydrodynamics of sea water beneath the ice sheet, the results demonstrate a velocity effect on the ice breaking loads in plane deformation, which compare well with available model test data. Moreover, our model formulation and implementation is such that the solutions for different ice velocities can be obtained rapidly from the reference solution, which facilitates the development of a real-time simulator. It is also shown that the velocity effect depends on the ice compressive strength and the angle of sloping structure.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In