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Research Papers: Piper and Riser Technology

Effects of Reeling on Pipe Structural Performance—Part II: Analysis

[+] Author and Article Information
Yafei Liu, Jyan-Ywan Dyau

Research Center for Mechanics of Solids,
Structures and Materials,
The University of Texas at Austin,
WRW 110,
Austin, TX 78712

Stelios Kyriakides

Research Center for Mechanics of Solids,
Structures and Materials,
The University of Texas at Austin,
WRW 110,
Austin, TX 78712
e-mail: skk@mail.utexas.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING. Manuscript received December 19, 2016; final manuscript received May 3, 2017; published online July 6, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Ioannis K. Chatjigeorgiou.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 139(5), 051707 (Jul 06, 2017) (12 pages) Paper No: OMAE-16-1159; doi: 10.1115/1.4037064 History: Received December 19, 2016; Revised May 03, 2017

Part II presents two modeling schemes for simulating the reeling/unreeling of a pipeline, with the aim of establishing the degrading effect of the process on the structural performance of the pipeline. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element model of the winding/unwinding of a long section of pipeline onto a rigid reel is presented first. The second model applies the curvature/tension loading history experienced at a point to a section of pipe in contact with a rigid surface of variable curvature. Both models use nonlinear kinematic hardening plasticity to model the loading/reverse loading of the material. The 3D model first demonstrates how the interaction of the problem nonlinearities influences the evolution of deformation and load parameters during reeling/unreeling. The two models are subsequently used to simulate the three-reeling/unreeling cycle experiments under different levels of back tension in Part I. The ovality-tension and axial elongation-tension results are reproduced by both models with accuracy for the first cycle, adequately for the second cycle, and are overpredicted for the third cycle. The two models are also used to simulate the reeling/unreeling followed by collapse of the tubes under external pressure experiments. Both models reproduce the measured ovality-tension results and the corresponding collapse pressures accurately. Since the two-dimensional (2D) model is computationally much more efficient, it is an attractive tool for estimating the effect of reeling on collapse pressure. Questions that require exact tracking of the winding/unwinding history and the interaction of the pipe with the reel are best answered using the 3D model.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Geometry of the reel/pipeline finite element model

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Fig. 2

Cyclic stress–strain response of the SS-304 material used and the fit using: (a) the Chaboche model and (b) the Tseng-Lee model

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Fig. 3

A 2D model of reeling involving a section of pipe being bent over a rigid surface of uniform curvature κ, in the presence of tension T

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Fig. 4

Calculated pipe reeling configurations for base case: I–III, winding and IV and V unwinding

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Fig. 5

Pipe deformed configurations showing the test section coming into contact with the reel during winding, ①–④, and unwinding ⑤–⑧

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Fig. 6

Evolution of section variables at A with reel rotation, ϕ, during a complete wind–unwind cycle: (a) moment, (b) curvature, (c) contact pressure, (d) ovalization, and (e) mean axial strain

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Fig. 7

Pipe deformed configurations with contact pressure that correspond to the tube coming: (a) into contact during winding and (b) off contact during unwinding

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Fig. 8

Two-dimensional model results for a single cycle wind/unwind cycle: (a) moment versus curvature and (b) ovalization and axial strain versus curvature

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Fig. 9

Three-dimensional model results at section A for a single wind/unwind cycle: (a) moment versus curvature and (b) ovalization and axial strain versus curvature

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Fig. 10

Evolution of variables at section A with reel rotation for three wind/unwind cycles: (a) moment, (b) curvature, (c) ovalization, and (d) mean axial strain

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Fig. 11

Three-dimensional model results at section A for three wind/unwind cycle: (a) moment versus curvature and (b) ovalization and axial strain versus curvature

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Fig. 12

Two-dimensional model results for three wind/unwind cycles: (a) moment versus curvature and (b) ovalization and axial strain versus curvature

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Fig. 13

Measured and predicted residual: (a) ovality and (b) axial strain versus tension for three wind/unwind cycles for pipes of D/t = 20

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Fig. 14

Measured and predicted residual: (a) ovality and (b) axial strain versus tension in three wind/unwind cycles for pipes of D/t = 15.5

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Fig. 15

Measured and 2D and 3D model predicted section variables after a single wind/unwind cycle for tubes with D/t = 20: (a) residual ovality versus tension and (b) collapse pressure versus tension (data on ordinate are from as received tubes)

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Fig. 16

(a) Finite element model for calculation of the collapse pressure of the test section of tube; included is the FE model of the tube and the surrounding fluid cavity. (b) Calculated pressure versus change of volume response of base case with D/t = 20.

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Fig. 17

Measured and 2D and 3D model predicted section variables after a single wind/unwind cycle for tubes of D/t = 15.5: (a) residual ovality versus tension and (b) collapse pressure versus tension (data on ordinate are from as received tubes)

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Fig. 18

(a) Uniaxial monotonic and hysteresis stress–strain responses and (b) yield and bounding surfaces of the Tseng–Lee model

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