0
Research Papers: Ocean Renewable Energy

Impact of Climate Change on Design of Offshore Wind Turbine Considering Dynamic Soil–Structure Interaction

[+] Author and Article Information
Swagata Bisoi

Department of Civil Engineering,
School of Infrastructure,
Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar,
Odisha 752050, India
e-mail: sb17@iitbbs.ac.in

Sumanta Haldar

Department of Civil Engineering,
School of Infrastructure,
Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar,
Odisha 752050, India
e-mail: sumanta@iitbbs.ac.in

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING. Manuscript received November 6, 2016; final manuscript received June 13, 2017; published online August 22, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Yi-Hsiang Yu.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 139(6), 061903 (Aug 22, 2017) (11 pages) Paper No: OMAE-16-1133; doi: 10.1115/1.4037294 History: Received November 06, 2016; Revised June 13, 2017

This study assesses the serviceability and fatigue limit states of the offshore wind turbine (OWT) founded in clay incorporating the impact of climate change. Two different offshore locations at east and west coasts in India are chosen. The ensemble of future time series of wind speed, wave height, and period is forecasted using statistical downscaling model (SDSM) at the regional level using the general circulation model (GCM) corresponding to the A1B, A2, and B1 emission scenarios. The downscaling model is calibrated by comparing simulations driven by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) high-resolution data and station data. Responses of OWT are obtained from dynamic analysis in a time domain using finite element (FE). The tower and monopile are modeled as Euler–Bernoulli beam, and soil resistance is modeled as American Petroleum Institute (API)-based p–y springs. The study shows future wind and wave loads are site specific, and it increases in the west coast and decreases in the east coast of India due to climate change. The simulation shows a substantial increase in future wind energy production at west coast compared to that of the east coast; however, safety margin considering serviceability and fatigue life decreases which requires modification in the design.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

The Indian coastline and the two offshore locations in which NCEP grid superposed on the selected location

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Forecasting methodology using statistical downscaling model

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Schematic diagram of OWT and finite element model

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Maximum responses: (a) θTower,max and (b) θPile,max for past and future climate for SW03

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Maximum responses: (a) θTower,max and (b) θPile,max for past and future climate for SW05

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Fatigue life of OWT for (a) SW03 and (b) SW05

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Cumulative distribution of wind speed for (a) past and (b) future climate change and wave height for (c) past and (d) future climate change

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In