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Research Papers: Ocean Renewable Energy

Flow-Induced Vibration and Hydrokinetic Power Conversion of Two Staggered Rough Cylinders for 2.5 × 104 < Re < 1.2 × 105

[+] Author and Article Information
Wanhai Xu

State Key Laboratory of Hydraulic Engineering
Simulation and Safety,
Tianjin University,
Tianjin 30072, China;
Marine Renewable Energy Laboratory,
University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2145
e-mail: xuwanhai@tju.edu.cn

Chunning Ji

State Key Laboratory of Hydraulic Engineering
Simulation and Safety,
Tianjin University,
Tianjin 30072, China;
Marine Renewable Energy Laboratory,
University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2145
e-mail: cnji@tju.edu.cn

Hai Sun

Marine Renewable Energy Laboratory,
University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2145;
College of Aerospace and Civil Engineering,
Harbin Engineering University,
Harbin 150001, China
e-mail: sunhai2009@gmail.com

Wenjun Ding

Marine Renewable Energy Laboratory,
University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2145;
School of Marine Science and Technology,
Northwestern Polytechnical University,
Xi'an 710072, China
e-mail: dingwen@umich.edu

Michael M. Bernitsas

Marine Renewable Energy Laboratory,
University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2145;
Department Naval Architecture
and Marine Engineering,
Department Mechanical Engineering,
CTO Vortex Hydro Energy,
Ann Arbor, MI 48108
e-mail: michaelb@umich.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING. Manuscript received April 1, 2017; final manuscript received November 17, 2017; published online February 8, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Celso P. Pesce.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 140(2), 021905 (Feb 08, 2018) (8 pages) Paper No: OMAE-17-1051; doi: 10.1115/1.4038932 History: Received April 01, 2017; Revised November 17, 2017

Flow-induced vibration (FIV), primarily vortex-induced vibrations (VIV), and galloping have been used effectively to convert hydrokinetic energy to electricity in model-tests and field-tests by the Marine Renewable Energy Laboratory (MRELab) of the University of Michigan. It is known that the response of cylinders with passive turbulence control (PTC) undergoing vortex shedding differs from the oscillation of smooth cylinders in a similar configuration. Additional investigation on the FIV of two elastically mounted circular cylinders in a staggered arrangement with low mass ratio in the TrSL3 flow-regime is required and is contributed by this paper. The two PTC-cylinders were allowed to oscillate in the transverse direction to the oncoming fluid flow in a recirculating water channel. The cylinder model with a length of 0.895 m and a diameter of 8.89 cm, a mass ratio of 1.343 was used in the tests. The Reynolds number was in the range of 2.5 × 104 < Re < 1.2 × 105, which is a subset of the TrSL3 flow-regime. The center-to-center longitudinal and transverse spacing distances were T/D = 2.57 and S/D = 1.0, respectively. The spring stiffness values were in the range of 400 < K (N/m) <1200. The values of harnessing damping ratio tested were ζharness = 0.04, 0.12 and 0.24. For the values tested, the experimental results indicate that the response of the upstream cylinder is similar to the single cylinder. The downstream cylinder exhibits more complicated vibrations. In addition, the oscillation system of two cylinders with stiffer spring and higher ζharness could initiate total power harness at a higher flow velocity and obtain more power.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of the LTFSW channel (a) and Vck system (b)

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Fig. 2

Two staggered cylinders in steady uniform flow

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Fig. 3

Configuration of PTC along the cylinder [12]

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Fig. 4

Response amplitudes of the (a) upstream cylinder and (b) downstream cylinder for different damping ratios with K = 400 N/m

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Fig. 5

Response amplitudes of the (a) upstream cylinder and (b) downstream cylinder for different damping ratios with K = 800 N/m

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Fig. 6

Response amplitudes of the (a) upstream cylinder and (b) downstream cylinder for different damping ratios with K = 1200 N/m

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Fig. 7

Harnessed power of the (a) upstream cylinder and (b) downstream cylinder with K = 400 N/m

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Fig. 8

Harnessed power of the (a) upstream cylinder and (b) downstream cylinder with K = 800 N/m

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Fig. 9

Harnessed power of the (a) upstream cylinder and (b) downstream cylinder with K = 1200 N/m

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Fig. 10

Total power curves of the two staggered cylinders system for different damping ratios with K = 400 N/m

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Fig. 11

Total power curves of the two staggered cylinders system for different damping ratios with K = 800 N/m

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Fig. 12

Total power curves of the two staggered cylinders system for different damping ratios with K = 1200 N/m

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