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research-article

PIV Experiment and CFD Simulation of Flow around Rigid Cylinder

[+] Author and Article Information
Guangyao Wang

Ocean Engineering Group, Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712
gw5923@utexas.edu

Ye Tian

Ocean Engineering Group, Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712
tianye@utexas.edu

Spyros A. Kinnas

Ocean Engineering Group, Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712
kinnas@mail.utexas.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4039948 History: Received August 19, 2015; Revised April 05, 2018

Abstract

This work focuses on the study of flow around a rigid cylinder with both Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) experiment and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. PIV measurements of the flow field at the downstream of the cylinder are first presented. The boundary conditions for CFD simulations are measured in the PIV experiment. Then the PIV flow is compared with both RANS (2D) and LES (3D) simulations performed with ANSYS Fluent. The velocity vector fields and time histories of velocity are analyzed. In addition, the time-averaged velocity profiles and Reynolds stresses are analyzed. It is found that, in general, LES (3D) gives a better prediction of flow characteristics than RANS (2D).

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