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Research Papers: Offshore Technology

A Preliminary Investigation on the Risk Arising From the Use of High Pressure Fuel Gas Supply System in LNGC by Analyzing Risk Contributors Comparatively

[+] Author and Article Information
Joon Young Yoon

Department of Gas & Safety R&D,
Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine
Engineering Co., Ltd.,
Geoje 53302, South Korea
e-mail: jyyoon83@dsme.co.kr

Sung-In Park

Department of Naval Architecture
and Ocean Engineering,
Pusan National University,
Busan 46241, South Korea
e-mail: parksungin@pusan.ac.kr

Jae Bong Lee

Department of Gas & Safety R&D,
Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine
Engineering Co., Ltd.,
Geoje 53302, South Korea
e-mail: jblee80@dsme.co.kr

Seungmin Kwon

Department of Gas & Safety R&D,
Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine
Engineering Co., Ltd.,
Geoje 53302, South Korea
e-mail: smkwon@dsme.co.kr

Yoonsik Hwang

Department of Gas & Safety R&D,
Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine
Engineering Co., Ltd.,
Geoje 53302, South Korea
e-mail: yshwang1@dsme.co.kr

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING. Manuscript received May 13, 2018; final manuscript received August 23, 2018; published online November 8, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Yordan Garbatov.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 141(1), 011303 (Nov 08, 2018) (12 pages) Paper No: OMAE-18-1061; doi: 10.1115/1.4041302 History: Received May 13, 2018; Revised August 23, 2018

This work is motivated by the need to identify the fire and explosion risk on liquefied natural gas carriers (LNGCs) developed by Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co., Ltd., because the main engines are designed to use highly pressurized natural gas (about 300 bar), which has caused vague fears of fire and explosion risks. In this context, to identify the risk of fires and explosions quantitatively, a fire and explosion risk analysis (FERA) was carried out for the LNGCs. This paper, as a part of the FERA, presents the results of a preliminary investigation on the effect of introducing the highly pressured fuel gas system into LNGCs on the fire and explosion risk especially in the cargo compressor room. This study is conducted in a comparative way considering the risk contribution of each parameter that could impact on the fire and explosion risk. The effect of the highly pressured fuel gas is indirectly taken into account by the change of the initial leak rate in the system. To identify effects of the considered parameters quantitatively, dozens of simulations for the selected gas dispersion, explosion, and fire scenarios were carried out using FLACS and KFX. Based on the simulation results, it is concluded that, in case of the LNGCs, the effects of the initial large leak rate due to the high pressure in the fuel gas pipes on the fire and explosion risk are not significant compared with the effects of other parameters such as leak amount, leak location, and leak direction.

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References

DSME, 2015, “ Fire & Explosion Risk Analysis for Engine Room and Cargo Compressor Room in LNG Carrier Using ME-GI Fuel Supply System,” Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering, Geoje, South Korea.
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Figures

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Fig. 1

The geometry of the cargo compressor room used for FLACS simulations

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Fig. 2

Velocity contour of the air flow in the cargo compressor room obtained after 30 s of simulation

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Fig. 3

The leak profiles for the gas dispersion scenarios

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Fig. 4

Stoichiometric gas cloud sizes over time for L7 and L14

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Fig. 5

Contour plot of the gas cloud of which the concentration is above LFL at the time when the maximum flammable volume is reached for L7

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Fig. 6

Contour plot of the gas cloud of which the concentration is above LFL at the time when the maximum flammable volume is reached for L14

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Fig. 7

The maximum stoichiometric gas volume versus the initial leak rate (L7 and L13–17)

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Fig. 8

The maximum stoichiometric gas volume versus the initial leak rate (L7 and L13–17)

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Fig. 9

The maximum equivalent stoichiometric gas cloud volumes for L1–12 (FBR scenarios)

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Fig. 10

Gas cloud and ignition location for the cargo compressor room: (a) for E1, (b) for E2 and E3, (c) for E4 and E5, (d) for E6 and E7, (e) for E8 and E9, and (f) E10 and E11

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Fig. 11

Pressure versus time history of E11

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Fig. 12

Contour plot of the maximum overpressure of E11

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Fig. 13

Relation between the maximum explosion overpressure monitored on 3.2 m × 3.2 m panels and the stoichiometric gas cloud volume

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Fig. 14

The 3D model of the cargo compressor room used for the KFX fire simulation

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Fig. 15

Selected leak locations and directions for the fire simulations

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Fig. 16

Transient leak profiles against leak sizes for the cargo compressor room fire simulation

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Fig. 17

Ventilation condition for the cargo compressor room fire simulation (the fire dampers will be closed in actual situations but considered as openings in fire simulations)

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Fig. 18

Heat radiation contours in the cargo compressor room

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Fig. 19

Leak directional radiation heat flux contours at specific time steps (scenario F4)

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Fig. 20

Measured and expected transient radiation heat flux values on the trunk deck (scenario F5)

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Fig. 21

Radiation heat flux contours on the trunk deck at specific time steps (scenario F5)

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Fig. 22

Elevated temperature on the trunk deck

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