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research-article

Simulation of Wave Interaction with a Circular Ice Floe

[+] Author and Article Information
Luofeng Huang

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, London, United Kingdom, WC1E 6BT
ucemlhu@ucl.ac.uk

Giles Thomas

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, London, United Kingdom, WC1E 6BT
giles.thomas@ucl.ac.uk

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4042096 History: Received October 07, 2018; Revised November 19, 2018

Abstract

Global warming is inducing sea ice retreat, which is opening new shipping routes and extending the accessible area for resource exploration. This encourages an increasing research interest in sea ice behaviour. With the sea ice melting, level ice is broken up by waves propagated from the open ocean, resulting in an environment where both floating ice floes and waves exist. Such wave-ice interaction can bring significant influences on the potential human activities. This work presents a series of numerical simulations to predict the behaviour of a circular ice floe forced by regular waves, with different wavelength and wave amplitude conditions being investigated. The numerical model was validated against experiments, and it revealed good accuracy in predicting the rigid body motion of an ice floe, including some extreme cases that are difficult to model by previous methods. Two specific behaviours were observed during the numerical simulations, namely overwash and scattering. Both behaviours are discussed in detail to analyse their linear/nonlinear effect on the ice floe motion. The applied model could be used to provide valuable estimations for Arctic engineering purposes.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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