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Research Papers: Ocean Renewable Energy

Basic Characteristics of the Primary Conversion of an Oscillating Water Column Type Wave Energy Converter Installed on a Wave-Dissipating Double Caisson

[+] Author and Article Information
Tomoki Ikoma

Department of Oceanic Architecture and Engineering,
CST, Nihon University
Funabashi, Chiba, Japan
e-mail: ikoma.tomoki@nihon-u.ac.jp

Koichi Masuda

Department of Oceanic Architecture and Engineering,
CST, Nihon University
Funabashi, Chiba, Japan
e-mail: masuda.koichi@nihon-u.ac.jp

Hiroaki Eto

Department of Oceanic Architecture and Engineering,
CST, Nihon University,
Funabashi, Chiba, Japan
e-mail: eto.hiroaki@nihon-u.ac.jp

Shogo Shibuya

Department of Oceanic Architecture and Engineering,
CST, Nihon University
Funabashi, Chiba, Japan
e-mail: cssh16014@g.nihon-u.ac.jp

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering. Manuscript received June 28, 2018; final manuscript received February 10, 2019; published online March 20, 2019. Assoc. Editor: Francisco J. Huera-Huarte.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 141(6), 061902 (Mar 20, 2019) (8 pages) Paper No: OMAE-18-1088; doi: 10.1115/1.4042943 History: Received June 28, 2018; Accepted February 10, 2019

Several types of oscillating water column (OWC) type wave energy converters (WECs) are researched and developed in the world. They are floating types and fixed types. In case of a fixed type, wave-dissipating caissons could be replaced by WECs of an OWC type. In OWC types, installation of the projecting walls (PWs) is useful in order to improve power take-off (PTO) performance. In this study, a double-dissipating caisson was used as an OWC type WEC with PWs. A front caisson of the double caisson seems to be the area surrounded by PWs and a back caisson can be seen as an OWC. The paper studied the basic property of the primary conversion from wave power to pneumatic power from model tests in a wave tank. It was found that the wave height strongly affects the behaviors of OWC motion and air pressure. Finally, the primary conversion was affected by wave height. Besides, the concept of use of a double caisson was useful for the primary conversion over 80% evaluated using test data.

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References

Falcao, A. F., and Henriques, J. C., 2016, “Oscillating-Water-Column Wave Energy Converters and Air Turbines: A Review,” Renew. Energy, 85, pp. 1391–1424. [CrossRef]
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Toyoda, K., Nagata, S., Imai, Y., and Setoguchi, T. 2008, “Effects of Hull Shape on Primary Conversion Characteristics of a Floating OWC ‘Backward Bent Duct Buoy’,” J. Fluid Sci. Technol., 3, pp. 458–465. [CrossRef]
Ikoma, T., Masuda, K., Omori, H., Osawa, H., and Maeda, H., 2016, “Improvement of Performance of Wave Power Conversion Due to the Projecting Walls for Oscillating Water Column Type Wave Energy Converter,” ASME J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng., 138(2), p. 021902. [CrossRef]
Evans, D., 1976, “A Theory for Wave-Power Absorption by Oscillating Bodies,” J. Fluid Mech., 77(1), pp. 1–25. [CrossRef]
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Iturrioz, A., Guanche, R., Lara, J., Vidal, C., and Losada, I., 2015, “Validation of OpenFOAM® for Oscillating Water Column Three-Dimensional Modelling,” Ocean Eng., 107, pp. 222–236. [CrossRef]
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Simonetti, I., Cappietti, L., El, S. H., and Oumeraci, H., 2015, “Numerical Modelling of Fixed Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Conversion Devices: Toward Geometry Hydraulic Optimization,” Proceedings of the ASME 34th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering, St. John’s, Canada, May 31–June 5.
Vyzikas, T., Deshoulieres, S., Giroux, O., Barton, M., and Greaves, D., 2017, “Numerical Study of Fixed Oscillating Water Column With RANS-Type Two-Phase CFD Model,” Renew. Energy, 102, pp. 294–305. [CrossRef]
Ikoma, T., Masuda, K., Eto, H., Kihara, K., Maeda, H., and Takahatake, M., 2015, “Utilization of Wave Dissipating Caissons as an OWC Type Wave Energy Convertor,” Proceedings of the ASME 2015 34th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering, St. John’s, Canada, May 31–June 5.

Figures

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Fig. 1

Power conversion process of OWC type WECs

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Fig. 2

Experimental setup system: (a) horizontal plan, (b) section plan, and (c) detail of a section of the experimental model with double caisson with wickets

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Fig. 3

Experimental setup system

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Fig. 4

Comparison of mean water elevation with a nozzle ratio of 1/200 on the variation of duct volume and wave height in 0 deg waves

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Fig. 5

Comparison of mean water elevation with a nozzle ratio of 1/150 on the variation of duct volume and wave height in 0 deg waves

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Fig. 6

Comparison of mean water elevation with a nozzle ratio of 1/200 on the variation of wave direction and wave height with V1

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Fig. 7

Comparison of mean water elevation with a nozzle ratio of 1/150 on the variation of wave direction and wave height with V1

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Fig. 8

Comparison of air pressure in the air chamber with a nozzle ratio of 1/200 on the variation of duct volume and wave height in 0 deg waves

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Fig. 9

Comparison of air pressure in the air chamber with a nozzle ratio of 1/150 on the variation of duct volume and wave height in 0 deg waves

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Fig. 10

Comparison of air pressure in the air chamber with a nozzle ratio of 1/200 on the variation of wave direction and wave height with V1

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Fig. 11

Comparison of air pressure in the air chamber with a nozzle ratio of 1/150 on the variation of wave direction and wave height with V1

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Fig. 12

Comparison of primary conversion characteristics of the model with a nozzle ratio of 1/200 on the variation of duct volume and wave height in 0 deg waves: (a) primary conversion coefficients and (b) amount of power converted from wave to air (unit: Watts)

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Fig. 13

Comparison of primary conversion characteristics of the model with a nozzle ratio of 1/150 on the variation of duct volume and wave height in 0 deg waves: (a) primary conversion coefficients and (b) amount of power converted from wave to air (unit: Watts)

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Fig. 14

Comparison of primary conversion characteristics of the model with a nozzle ratio of 1/200 on the variation of wave direction and wave height with V1: (a) primary conversion coefficients and (b) amount of power converted from wave to air (unit: Watts)

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Fig. 15

Comparison of primary conversion characteristics of the model with a nozzle ratio of 1/150 on the variation of wave direction and wave height with V1: (a) primary conversion coefficients and (b) amount of power converted from wave to air (unit: Watts)

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Fig. 16

Comparison of air pressure measured and predicted in front of the nozzle (H = 0.04 m and nozzle ratio 1/200)

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Fig. 17

Comparison of air pressure measured and predicted in front of the nozzle (H = 0.06 m and nozzle ratio 1/200)

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Fig. 18

Comparison of air pressure measured and predicted in front of the nozzle (H = 0.04 m and nozzle ratio 1/150)

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Fig. 19

Comparison of air pressure measured and predicted in front of the nozzle (H = 0.06 m and nozzle ratio 1/150)

Tables

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