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Research Papers: CFD and VIV

Investigation on the Performance of a Ducted Propeller in Oblique Flow

[+] Author and Article Information
Qin Zhang

Keppel-NUS Corporate Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
National University of Singapore,
Singapore 119077
e-mail: mpezhqin@nus.edu.sg

Rajeev K. Jaiman

Assistant Professor
Keppel-NUS Corporate Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
National University of Singapore,
Singapore 119077
e-mail: mperkj@nus.edu.sg

Peifeng Ma

Keppel Offshore and Marine Technology Centre,
Singapore 628130
e-mail: PeiFeng.MA@komtech.com.sg

Jing Liu

Keppel Offshore and Marine Technology Centre,
Singapore 628130
e-mail: jing.liu@komtech.com.sg

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering. Manuscript received September 20, 2017; final manuscript received May 23, 2019; published online July 3, 2019. Assoc. Editor: Yi-Hsiang Yu.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 142(1), 011801 (Jul 03, 2019) (11 pages) Paper No: OMAE-17-1171; doi: 10.1115/1.4043943 History: Received September 20, 2017; Accepted May 24, 2019

In this study, the ducted propeller has been numerically investigated under oblique flow, which is crucial and challenging for the design and safe operation of the thruster driven vessel and dynamic positioning (DP) system. A Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) model has been first evaluated in the quasi-steady investigation on a single ducted propeller operating in open water condition, and then a hybrid RANS/LES model is adapted for the transient sliding mesh computations. A representative test geometry considered here is a marine model thruster, which is discretized with structured hexahedral cells, and the gap between the blade tip and nozzle is carefully meshed to capture the flow dynamics. The computational results are assessed by a systematic grid convergence study and compared with the available experimental data. As a part of the novel contribution, multiple incidence angles from 15 deg to 60 deg have been analyzed with different advance coefficients. The main emphasis has been placed on the hydrodynamic loads that act on the propeller blades and nozzle as well as their variation with different configurations. The results reveal that while the nozzle absorbs much effort from the oblique flow, the imbalance between blades at different positions is still noticeable. Such unbalance flow dynamics on the blades, and the nozzle has a direct implication on the variation of thrust and torque of a marine thruster.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Geometry of the ducted propeller. The blade position according to angular coordinate is labeled in the left figure. (a) Front view and (b) side view.

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Fig. 2

Computational domain of ducted propeller setup

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Fig. 3

Ducted propeller under oblique flow. The rotor region is indicated by gray color.

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Fig. 4

Computational mesh in the vicinity of ducted propeller simulation subjected to axis flow and oblique flow. The close-up mesh in the gap is shown in Fig. 5. (a) Side view, (b) front view, and (c) side view mesh of oblique flow case.

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Fig. 5

Close-up mesh in the gap between the blade tip and nozzle

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Fig. 6

Validation of present MRF and AMI simulation results against experimental and numerical data from the literature

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Fig. 7

Comparison of performance characteristics of nonducted and ducted propellers in open water: (a) thrust force and (b) torque and efficiency

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Fig. 8

Ducted propeller open water characteristics under 0 deg, 30 deg, and 45 deg inflow angles: (a) propeller component and nozzle component thrust force and (b) ducted propeller total thrust and propeller component torque

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Fig. 9

Ducted propeller efficiency under 0 deg, 30 deg, and 45 deg inflow angle

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Fig. 10

Ducted propeller load for three representative directions: (a) Tpx/Tref and Tnx/Tref, (b) (Tpx + Tpn)/Tref and Qpx/Qref, (c) Tpy/Tref and Tny/Tref, (d) (Tpy + Tpn)/Tref and Qpy/Qref, (e) Tpz/Tref and Tnz/Tref, and (f) (Tpz + Tpn)/Tref and Qpz/Qref

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Fig. 11

Comparison of performance characteristics of the nonducted and ducted propeller in oblique flow: (a) Tx/Tref, (b) Qy/Qref, (c) Ty/Tref, (d) Qy/Qref, (e) Tz/Tref, and (f) Qz/Qref

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Fig. 12

Pressure distribution on the suction side for steady-state and transient computations

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Fig. 13

Pressure distribution on the pressure side for steady-state and transient computations

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Fig. 14

Pressure distribution on the inside surface of the nozzle for steady-state and transient computations

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Fig. 15

Pressure distribution on the outside surface of the nozzle for steady-state and transient computations

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Fig. 16

Transient solution of Cp at blade section r/R = 0.65 for four positions

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Fig. 17

Transient solution of Cp at blade section r/R = 0.96 over four representative positions

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Fig. 18

Ux velocity parallel to the propeller plane (X/D = 0.2). Left: steady-state solution and right: instantaneous solution.

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Fig. 19

Streamwise Ux velocity parallel to the propeller plane (X/D = 0.1). Left: steady-state and right: instantaneous.

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Fig. 20

Streamwise Ux velocity parallel to the propeller plane (X/D = −0.1). Left: steady-state and right: instantaneous.

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Fig. 21

Streamwise Ux velocity parallel to the propeller plane (X/D = −0.2). Left: steady-state solution and right: instantaneous solution.

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Fig. 22

Dimensionless streamwise velocity in the horizontal plane. Left: steady-state solution, center: instantaneous solution, and right: time-averaged field.

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