In the last decade, applications of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) methods for industrial applications received more and more attention, as they proved to be a valuable complementary tool for design and optimization. The main interest towards CFD consists in fact in the possibility of obtaining detailed 3D complete flow-field information on relevant physical phenomena at lower cost than experiments. Typically free surfaces manifest as stratified and wavy flows in horizontal flow domain where gas and liquid are separated by gravity.

Stratified two-phase flows are relevant in many industrial applications, e.g. pipelines, horizontal heat exchangers and storage tanks. This paper presents different CFD-simulations on flows using a new modeling approach for the interfacial drag at free surfaces. The developed drag coefficient model was implemented together with the Algebraic Interfacial Area Density (AIAD) model into the three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code ANSYS-CFX. The applications considered include the prediction of countercurrent flow limitations (CCFL) in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) hot leg, the development of hydraulic jump during the air-water co-current flow in a horizontal channel, and pressurized thermal shock (PTS) phenomena in a PWR cold leg and downcomer. For the modeling of these tasks, an Euler–Euler approach was used. This approach allows the use of different models depending on the local morphology. In the frame of an Euler-Euler simulation, the local morphology of the phases has to be considered in the drag model.

To demonstrate the feasibility of the present approach, the computed main parameters of each case were compared with experimental data. It is shown that the CFD calculations agree well with the experimental data. This indicates that the AIAD model combined with new drag force modeling is a promising way to simulate the phenomena in frame of the Euler-Euler approach. Moreover the further validation of the model by including mass transfer effects should be carried out.

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