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Research Papers: CFD and VIV

Numerical Modeling of Berm Breakwater Optimization With Varying Berm Geometry Using REEF3D

[+] Author and Article Information
Athul Sasikumar

Coastal Engineering Norconsult AS,
Klæbuveien,
Trondheim 7031, Norway
e-mail: athul.sasikumar@norconsult.com

Arun Kamath

Department of Civil and Environmental
Engineering,
Norwegian University of Science and
Technology,
Trondheim 7491, Norway
e-mail: arun.kamath@ntnu.no

Onno Musch

Coastal Engineering Norconsult AS,
Klæbuveien,
Trondheim 7031, Norway
e-mail: onno.musch@norconsult.com

Hans Bihs

Department of Civil and Environmental
Engineering,
Norwegian University of Science and
Technology,
Trondheim 7491, Norway
e-mail: hans.bihs@ntnu.no

Øivind A. Arntsen

Department of Civil and Environmental
Engineering,
Norwegian University of Science and
Technology,
Trondheim 7491, Norway
e-mail: oivind.arnsten@ntnu.no

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING. Manuscript received September 13, 2017; final manuscript received June 4, 2018; published online August 13, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Xi-Ying Zhang.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 141(1), 011801 (Aug 13, 2018) (10 pages) Paper No: OMAE-17-1164; doi: 10.1115/1.4040508 History: Received September 13, 2017; Revised June 04, 2018

Harbors are important infrastructures for an offshore production chain. These harbors are protected from the actions of sea by breakwaters to ensure safe loading, unloading of vessels and also to protect the infrastructure. In current literature, research regarding the design of these structures is majorly based on physical model tests. In this study a new tool, a three-dimensional (3D) numerical model is introduced. The open-source computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model REEF3D is used to study the design of berm breakwaters. The model uses the Volume-averaged Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (VRANS) equations to solve the porous flows. At first, the VRANS approach in REEF3D is validated for flow through porous media. A dam break case is simulated and comparisons are made for the free surface both inside and outside the porous medium. The numerical model REEF3D is applied to show how to extend the database obtained with purely numerical results, simulating different structural alternatives for the berm in a berm breakwater. Different simulations are conducted with varying berm geometry. The influence of the berm geometry on the pore pressure and velocities are studied. The resulting optimal berm geometry is compared to the geometry according to empirical formulations.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Berm breakwaters and Rec parameter: (a) dynamically/statically stable berm breakwater and (b) recession of berm breakwaters [1]

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Fig. 3

Volume averaging in porous media

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Fig. 4

Setup for 2D dam break

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Fig. 5

Comparison of free surface profiles for flow passing through porous medium—glass beads. Red dots indicate experimental data and black line indicate numerical data: (a) 0.0 s, (b) 0.4 s, (c) 0.8 s, (d) 1.2 s, (e) 1.6 s, and (f) 4.0 s.

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Fig. 6

Setup for berm breakwater in NWT

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Fig. 7

Berm breakwater geometry (hB/d = 1.14)

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Fig. 8

Velocity and pore pressure variation inside berm breakwater with different berm height, boxes indicating theoretical range: (a) probe 1—velocity, (b) probe 2—velocity, (c) probe 3—velocity, (d) probe 1—pressure, (e) probe 2—pressure, and (f) probe 3—pressure

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Fig. 9

Free surface near berm for different hB/d ratio: (a) hB/d =1.07, (b) hB/d =1.14, (c) hB/d =1.21, and (d) hB/d =1.28

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Fig. 10

Free surface near berm for hB/d ratio of 1.14

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Fig. 11

Velocity and pore pressure variation inside berm breakwater with different berm width, boxes indicating theoretical range: (a) probe 1—velocity, (b) probe 2—velocity, (c) probe 3—velocity, (d) probe 1—pressure, (e) probe 2—pressure, and (f) probe 3—pressure

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Fig. 12

Velocity and pore pressure variation inside berm breakwater with different berm slope: (a) probe 1—velocity, (b) probe 2—velocity, (c) probe 3—velocity, (d) probe 1—pressure, (e) probe 2—pressure, and (f) probe 3—pressure

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