0
Research Papers: CFD and VIV

Prediction of Combined Inline and Crossflow Vortex-Induced Vibrations Response of Deepwater Risers

[+] Author and Article Information
Jie Wu

SINTEF Ocean,
Trondheim 4760, Norway
e-mail: jie.wu@sintef.no

Malakonda Reddy Lekkala

Department of Mechanical and Structural
Engineering and Materials Science,
University of Stavanger,
Stavanger 4036, Norway
e-mail: malakonda_17006151@utp.edu.my

Muk Chen Ong

Department of Mechanical and Structural
Engineering and Materials Science,
University of Stavanger,
Stavanger 4036, Norway
e-mail: muk.c.ong@uis.no

Elizabeth Passano

SINTEF Ocean,
Trondheim 4760, Norway
e-mail: elizabeth.passano@sintef.no

Per Erlend Voie

DNV GL,
Trondheim 7075, Norway
e-mail: per.erlend.voie@dnvgl.com

Contributed by the Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING. Manuscript received October 10, 2017; final manuscript received November 18, 2018; published online January 17, 2019. Assoc. Editor: Ioannis K. Chatjigeorgiou.

J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng 141(4), 041803 (Jan 17, 2019) (8 pages) Paper No: OMAE-17-1184; doi: 10.1115/1.4042072 History: Received October 10, 2017; Revised November 18, 2018

Deepwater risers are susceptible to vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) when subjected to currents. When responding at high modes, fatigue damage in the inline (IL) direction may become equally important as the crossflow (CF) components. Accurate calculation of both IL and CF responses is therefore needed. Empirical VIV prediction programs, such as VIVANA “Passano et al. (2016, “VIVANA—Theory Manual Version 4.8,” Trondheim, Norway),” SHEAR7 “(Vandiver, J. K., and Li, L., 2007, “Shear7 v4.5 Program Theoretical Manual,” Department of Ocean Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA),” and VIVA “Triantafyllou et al. (1999, “Pragmatic Riser VIV Analysis,” Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, TX, May 3–6, Paper No. OTC-10931-MS.)” are the most common tools used by the offshore industry. Progress has been seen in the prediction of CF responses. Efforts have also been made to include an IL load model in VIVANA. A set of excitation coefficient parameters were obtained from rigid cylinder test and adjusted using measured responses of one of the flexible cylinder VIV tests. This set of excitation coefficient parameters is still considered preliminary and further validation is required. Without an accurate IL response prediction, a conservative approach in VIV analysis has to be followed, i.e., all current profiles have to be assumed to be unidirectional or acting in the same direction. The purpose of this paper is to provide a reliable combined IL and CF load model for the empirical VIV prediction programs. VIV prediction using the existing combined IL and CF load model in VIVANA is validated against selected flexible cylinder test data. A case study of a deepwater top tension riser (TTR) has been carried out. The results indicate that VIV fatigue damage using two-dimensional directional current profiles is less conservative compared to the traditional way of using unidirectional current profiles.

Copyright © 2019 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Passano, E. , Larsen, C. M. , Lie, H. , and Wu, J. , 2016, “VIVANA—Theory Manual Version 4.8,” Trondheim, Norway.
Vandiver, J. K. , and Li, L. , 2007, “Shear7 v4.5 Program Theoretical Manual,” Department of Ocean Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.
Triantafyllou, M. , Triantafyllou, G. , David Tein, Y. S. , and Ambrose, B. D. , 1999, “Pragmatic Riser VIV Analysis,” Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, TX, May 3–6, Paper No. OTC-10931-MS.
Srivilairit, T. , and Manuel, L. , 2009, “Vortex-Induced Vibration and Coincident Current Velocity Profiles for a Deepwater Drilling Riser,” ASME J. Offshore Mech. Arct. Eng., 131(2), p. 021101.
Passano, E. , Lie, H. , and Larsen, C. M. , 2012, “Comparison of Calculated In-Line Vortex Induced Vibrations to Model Tests,” ASME Paper No. OMAE2012-83387.
Chaplin, J. R. , Bearman, P. W. , Huera Huarte, F. J. , and Pattenden, R. J. , 2005, “Laboratory Measurements of Vortex-Induced Vibrations of a Vertical Tension Riser in a Stepped Current,” J. Fluids Struct., 21(1), pp. 3–24. [CrossRef]
Huse, E. , Kleiven, G. , and Nielsen, F. G. , 1998, “Large Scale Model Testing of Deep Sea Risers,” Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, TX, May 4–7, Paper No. OTC-8701-MS.
Trim, A. D. , Braaten, H. , Lie, H. , and Tognarelli, M. A. , 2005, “Experimental Investigation of Vortex-Induced Vibrations of Long Marine Risers,” J. Fluids Struct., 21(3), pp. 335–361. [CrossRef]
Baarholm, G. S. , Larsen, C. M. , and Lie, H. , 2006, “Effect of Strakes on Fatigue Damage Due to Cross-Flow VIV,” Third International Conference on Hydroelasticity in Marine Technology, Wuxi, China, Sept. 10–14.
Bourguet, R. , Karniadakis, G. E. , and Triantafyllou, M. S. , 2013, “Phasing Mechanisms Between the In-Line and Cross-Flow Vortex-Induced Vibrations of a Long-Tensioned Beam in Shear Flow,” J. Comput. Struct., 122, pp. 155–163. [CrossRef]
Venugopal, M. , 1996, “Damping and Response Prediction of a Flexible Cylinder in a Current,” Ph.D. thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA. https://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/11279
Gopalkrishnan, R. , 1992, Vortex-Induced Forces on Oscillating Bluff Cylinders, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.
Wu, J. , Lie, H. , Larsen, C. M. , Liapis, S. , and Baarholm, R. , 2016, “Vortex-Induced Vibration of a Flexible Cylinder: Interaction of the In-Line and Cross-Flow Responses,” J. Fluids Struct., 63, pp. 238–258. [CrossRef]
Dahl, J. J. M. , 2008, “Vortex-Induced Vibration of a Circular Cylinder With Combined In-Line and Cross-Flow Motion,” Ph.D. thesis, MIT Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA. https://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/44747
Soni, P. K. , 2008, “Hydrodynamic Coefficients for Vortex-Induced Vibrations of Flexible Beams,” Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Yin, D. , 2013, “Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Combined In-Line and Cross-Flow Vortex Induced Vibration,” Ph.D. thesis, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. https://brage.bibsys.no/xmlui/handle/11250/273121
Wu, J. , 2011, “Hydrodynamic Force Identification From Stochastic Vortex Induced Vibration Experiments With Slender Beams,” Ph.D. thesis, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. https://brage.bibsys.no/xmlui/handle/11250/237910
Wu, J. , Larsen, C. M. , and Lie, H. , 2010, “Estimation of Hydrodynamic Coefficients for VIV of Slender Beam at High Mode Orders,” ASME Paper No. OMAE2010-20327.
Voie, P. , Wu, J. , Larsen, C. M. , Resvanis, T. , Vandiver, J. K. , and Triantafyllou, M. , 2017, “Consolidated Guideline on Analysis of Vortex-Induced Vibrations in Risers and Umbilicals,” ASME Paper No. OMAE2017-61362.
Baarholm, G. , Larsen, C. M. , and Lie, H. , 2006, “On Fatigue Damage Accumulation From In-Line and Cross-Flow Vortex-Induced Vibrations on Risers,” J. Fluids Struct., 22(1), pp. 109–127. [CrossRef]
Brodtkorb, P. A. , Johannesson, P. , Lindgren, G. , Rychlik, I. , Ryden, J. , and Sjö, E. , 2000, “WAFO—A Matlab Toolbox for Analysis of Random Waves and Loads—A Tutorial,” Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Passano, E. , Larsen, C. M. , and Wu, J. , 2014, “On Prediction of Fatigue Damage From VIV,” ASME Paper No. OMAE2014-24217.

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Energy balance for a riser vibrating in a sheared flow profile. Adapted from Ref. [20].

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Crossflow excitation coefficient contour plots reconstructed from rigid cylinder pure CF test. Adapted from Ref. [12].

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Crossflow excitation coefficient contour plot generated from the adjusted set of parameters based on flexible cylinder VIV test data. Adapted from Ref. [19].

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Inline excitation coefficient (for combined IL and CF responses) contour plots (Reynolds number 10,000–60,000). Adapted from Ref. [1].

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

The NDP VIV test setup

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Crossflow dominating frequency comparison

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Inline dominating frequency comparison

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Crossflow dominating mode comparison

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Inline dominating mode comparison

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Crossflow maximum displacement over diameter ratio comparison

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Inline maximum displacement over diameter ratio comparison

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Points around the circumference

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Predicted maximum fatigue damage

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Crossflow (0 deg) maximum fatigue damage comparison

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

Inline (90 deg) maximum fatigue damage comparison

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

Maximum fatigue damage at 450 around the cross section comparison

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 18

Predicted displacement standard deviation of a TTR for 21 current profiles

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 19

Predicted maximum displacement standard deviation of a TTR

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 20

Predicted maximum fatigue damage at four points around the cross section of a TTR subjected to unidirectional current (heading: 0 deg)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 21

Current directions

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 22

Comparison of predicted minimum fatigue life of a TTR based on pure CF response analysis with unidirectional current profiles and combined IL and CF response analysis with 2D directional current profiles

Tables

Errata

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In