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research-article

Modeling Crane Induced Ship Motion Using the Moving Frame Method

[+] Author and Article Information
Paulo Jardim

Mechanical and Marine Engineering Western Norway University of Applied Sciences (HVL), Bergen, Norway, Buheilia 3, 4640 Søgne
alexander_jardim@hotmail.com

Jan Tore Rein

Mechanical and Marine Engineering Western Norway University of Applied Sciences (HVL), Bergen, Norway, Sandviksveien 23, 5036 Bergen
jantore@reins.no

Øystein Haveland

Mechanical and Marine Engineering Western Norway University of Applied Sciences (HVL), Bergen, Norway, Gulafjordvegen 1163, 5960 Dalsøyra
oyshav@gmail.com

Thorstein Rykkje

Mechanical and Marine Engineering Western Norway University of Applied Sciences (HVL), Bergen, Norway, Kristofer Jansons vei 71B 5089 Bergen
trry@hvl.no

Thomas Impelluso

Mechanical and Marine Engineering Western Norway University of Applied Sciences (HVL), Bergen, Norway, Inndalsveien 28, 5063 Bergen
tjm@hvl.no

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4042536 History: Received July 21, 2018; Revised January 06, 2019

Abstract

A decline in oil-related revenues challenges Norway to focus on new types of offshore installations. Often, ship-mounted crane systems transfer cargo or crew onto offshore installations such as floating windmills. This project analyzes the motion of a ship induced by an onboard crane in operation using a new theoretical approach to dynamics: The Moving Frame Method (MFM). The MFM draws upon Lie group theory and Cartan's Moving Frames. This, together with a compact notation from geometrical physics, makes it possible to extract the equations of motion, expeditiously. While others have applied aspects of these mathematical tools, the notation presented here brings these methods together; it is accessible, programmable and simple. In the MFM, the notation for multi-body dynamics and single body dynamics is the same; for 2D and 3D, the same. Most important, this paper presents a restricted variation of the angular velocity to use in Hamilton's Principle. This work accounts for the masses and geometry of all components, interactive motor couples and prepares for buoyancy forces and added mass. This research solves the equations numerically using a relatively simple numerical integration scheme. Then, the Cayley-Hamilton theorem and Rodriguez's formula reconstructs the rotation matrix for the ship. Furthermore, this work displays the rotating ship in 3D, viewable on mobile devices. This paper presents the results qualitatively as a 3D simulation. This research demonstrates that the MFM is suitable for the analysis of "smart ships," as the next step in this work.

Copyright (c) 2019 by ASME
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